nikon n60

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by alanportfolio, Mar 17, 2006.

  1. alanportfolio

    alanportfolio Member

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    I just received my Nikon N60 in the mail, and the controls are a bit complicated, but pretty cool. The only bad thing is, right now I don't have an auto-focus lense, and I was wondering where I can buy one for a relatively low price (maybe $60-$90).

    Also, the manual (which I had to download because the camera didn't come with it) said that I can only use DX-encoded iso 100 film. Why is that? Is that just recommended, or can I use any other iso or slide film?

    Thanks
     
  2. Sanjay Sen

    Sanjay Sen Member

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    You could get a Nikon zoom/prime lens from KEH (they are a sponsor of this site) for the price range that you mentioned. The 50/1.8 costs a little over $90 new from B&H, so you could get a used in good condition for less.

    A quick glance at the F60 manual says that it will work only with DX-coded film, between ISO 25 and 5000. Non DX-coded film will not work, but I never tried it and am not sure if there is a way to make it work. It will work with any film as long as it is DX-coded. The F60, which I have, is the same as the N60 and was sold under that name in Asia (and elsewhere).

    If you are interested in getting an original paper manual for your N60, you can get it here for $9.

    Good luck, and have fun!
     
  3. ras351

    ras351 Member

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    I don't know about this specific camera but most cameras which don't allow you to set a manual ISO setting will work with most DX encoded film. Sometimes the manufacturers take a few short cuts and don't put as many contacts in the cameras as needed to decipher all the film speed options but they'll handle the majority of those you're likely to find. The cameras usually default to ISO 100 if they're unable to determine the speed from the film canister. If you have the option of exposure compensation or manual settings you can work around it to some extent if it becomes an issue.

    Roger.
     
  4. Derek Lofgreen

    Derek Lofgreen Member

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    My pentax is like that but i use nail polish and an exacto knife to make my canister what ever speed I need. Go to the local 1 hour place and get a used canister for 100, 200, 400 and 800. Take a look at the paint pattern on them and then add polish or scrape away accordingly.

    D.
     
  5. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    I picked up some iso stick on labels from Porter's Camera so I could pump up the speed of my Tri-X to 1600 when I use a DX coding camera.
    Watch out for their shipping charges.It will rip your heart out if you don't live in the USA.

    Mike
     
  6. alanportfolio

    alanportfolio Member

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    thanks for the advice guys