'Nocon timer' From 220V to 110V

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by andrel23, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. andrel23

    andrel23 Member

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    Hi there,

    I am a new owner of an enlarger timer called 'Nocon Timer'. I got it from a fellow in south africa. Knowing that south africa, like many countries in Europe, are using
    220 Volts. Here, like everybody know, we are using 110. I have bought a converter to convert our 110 to 220 volts that the timer needs to be operating. Thus, this timer has an outlet to feed the enlarger. Do I need a converter also to reduce the 220 from the timer than back to the enlarger that is using 110 volts?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    I'd get a timer made for 110v.
     
  3. spijker

    spijker Subscriber

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    Yes, you would need another converter for the enlarger. Or put a 220V bulb in the enlarger.
     
  4. Bob Marvin

    Bob Marvin Member

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    You have 60 Hz AC current; the timer is probably made for 50 Hz, so the timing will be off.
     
  5. rorye

    rorye Subscriber

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    Well you don't see those everyday!
    Gene Nocon, master printer, wonderful stuff.
    "Photographic Printing" by Gene is one of my all time favorite books.
    Have fun with it!
     
  6. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    I doubt that it uses the supply frequency for timing - but if it did, it would still be consistent.

    You don't need a transformer to go back down to 110 volts. A relay with a coil rated at 220 volts can be used to switch your enlarger on, connected to the 110 volt supply.

    You could probably find a local electrician who could make this for you. However, it might be worth getting someone to look inside the timer to see if it can be converted to 110 volts. Often, equipment is fitted with a transformer with two primary windings, both 110 vlts. They are connected in parrallel for 110 volts and in series for 220 volts. You might be lucky!


    Steve.
     
  7. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    Easy things first. Check the voltage of the enlarger output.

    I would imagine(!) that 110 in can't give you 220 out. A simple voltmeter will disclose it's deepest secrets.
     
  8. spijker

    spijker Subscriber

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    He's feeding 220V into the timer. I would imagine(!) that 220 in can't give you 110 out. :whistling:

    Another option is to modify the timer such that the built-in relay switches a separate 110V supply. So the timer would have 2 power cords; the existing 220V for the timer itself and an additional 110V for the timer's enlarger relay switching contacts, not the solenoid. But it gets a bit messy that way and a mistake is easily made. Therefore I wouldn't recommend that route.

    Voltage converters are fairly cheap, check out these guys, they're in Montreal as well. But first see if the timer's internal power supply can be set to 110V.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 4, 2014
  9. gleaf

    gleaf Subscriber

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    My assumption (US practice based) is your abode is wired with 2 phases of 110-120 ac input at the breaker panel. That is 220 phase to phase and 110 each Phase to the Neutral. In the US the "Dryer Plug" or "Electric Stove Plug" is 30 to 50 amp per phase 220 rated. It might be there, just in an inconvenient place.
     
  10. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    I misinterpreted the OP. But yes, it's stepping up not down. DOH!
     
  11. andrel23

    andrel23 Member

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    My follow up:

    2 - 500W magnetic converters were bought to achieve a perfect operation. One up converting and one down. No delay for timing - The timer matches perfectly a 60 sec. operation compared to another timer. I think that this famous timer worth the 50$ investment, it came new in box!

    Thanks everybody for your input!

    All the best from Montreal!