Occasional E-6 problem in thin areas of transparency

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Chuck Mintz, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. Chuck Mintz

    Chuck Mintz Member

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    This E100G 4x5 was processed in the 5L E6 kit last year on my Jobo in an expert drum. I do not think it is the scanning. The typical symptom is that in thin areas they are very dirty and have a mottled appearance. I do not remember seeing the kind of solarization of the edge before. You can see in the blue where there it is not so thin that it looks fine (a little dirty but fine). Any idea of what is happening here? I have seen this on maybe one batch out of ten or twenty.
    Chuck
     

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  2. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Subscriber

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    I don't know about the black pepper grain. I get some of those sometimes but not with that "density".

    The strange edge of the tree trunk is in my hazardous opinion a problem of "registering" between two scans, meaning your scanner makes a two-pass (or multiple-pass) reading but than the software does not match exactly the two images. That means the hardware is not suitable for this kind of double-pass reading. If you use VueScan you should repeat disabling "Input - Multi exposure".

    As a side note, I don't understand how that house can have shutters which are smaller than the window they are supposed to shut, it's the first time I see something like that.
     
  3. Chuck Mintz

    Chuck Mintz Member

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    I am more concerned with the odd "graininess" than the edge since I have seen only the former before. This is from an exhibit of foreclosed homes everywhere I have ever lived. The shutters are only decorative which was common on homes of this vintage (I am guessing 1968) in the suburbs here in the US.