Oh $hit. What do I do now?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by pbromaghin, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. pbromaghin

    pbromaghin Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,940
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    Location:
    Castle Rock,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just discovered that I have a roll in my 1940's Zeiss folder but can't remember what it is. It could be Ilford PanF, FP4, HP5 or Delta 400. How can I know the difference or how can I shoot and get good results, no matter what it is? There are 10 shots left.

    Gawd, how dumb is this?
     
  2. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

    Messages:
    2,115
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Location:
    NYC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If it has a window, pull it open and take a peak at the paper color/ number text. Or open up the camera in a darkroom or changing bag, roll the film back onto main roll and take out, reload and shoot two frames with lens cap, or cover on. 3 frames if the first two is important enough to ensure no overlaps.
     
  3. mcgrattan

    mcgrattan Member

    Messages:
    506
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    Location:
    Oxford, Engl
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Or, if you don't want to open it, you could probably shoot the whole roll at EI 100. And then pull it slightly in development if it's HP5 or Delta, or push slightly if it's Pan F.
     
  4. 250swb

    250swb Member

    Messages:
    394
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    Location:
    Peak Distric
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    This is what masking tape and a permanent marker pen were invented for!:smile: But I think if you can't recognise the film by the backing paper the above suggestion will work fine. In fact if you got some DiXactol Ultra developer, use as a single bath, then the processing time for any type of film is pretty much the same. You really can put a roll of FP4 and a roll of HP5 in the same tank and get perfect results for each.

    Steve
     
  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,970
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I think the problem is what speed to expose it for rather than develop it.

    I would use EI 100. If it's Pan F, it will only need one stop push development and if it's Delta 400 or HP5, it will look fine pulled two stops. If it's FP4, then no problem!


    Steve.
     
  6. TareqPhoto

    TareqPhoto Subscriber

    Messages:
    969
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2009
    Location:
    Ajman - U.A.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Or use Diafine, whatever film it is, this developer has almost same time of processing to any film [3-5min] under any temp range of standard [18-30C], that if i am correct, so that i bought this developer for emergency of some old or unknown B&W films un-opened.
     
  7. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,685
    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Beaverton, OR
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Quit being so frugal. I mean that in all seriousness.

    Wind off the roll in the camera and develop.

    Put in a new roll and go shoot.
     
  8. Felinik

    Felinik Member

    Messages:
    428
    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Open the camera in darkroom/changing bag, tear off a small piece of the protective paper, big enough to identify the film, small enough to not ruin the entire film.
     
  9. maarten m

    maarten m Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Location:
    gent belgium
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    really, why bother. i stand with markbarendt.
    or, if you care about the pics that are on it ànd want to use the remaining: shoot at 100iso.
     
  10. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,289
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If the folder has a red window and independant shutter cock then take it in the DR and rewind so it can be pulled and looked at. Then re-insert and wind back to where you left off. Otherwise I would have to agree with Mark and Maarten
     
  11. dsmccrac

    dsmccrac Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Basically I stand with the "process it now " camp but I have gotten into this situation before where for whatever reason i needed to use/save the whole roll (eg rare film, short on film, broke). Treat it as two rolls of film. In the dark open the camera cut off the exposed film and load it on the reel and then in the dark fumble around reloading your camera ;-) You will have a hunk of the paper to tell you what is left. Even if you do it smoothly you will loose a couple of shots.
     
  12. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,699
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    In the future ....

    Most of my cameras have an accessory shoe. I usually tear off and fold up the end of the film box in a way that allows it to be wedged in the accessory shoe with a hint of the film type showing. Otherwise, 250sb's marker and masking tape is good.

    If it were me, I'd go in the darkroom and roll it back to the beginning, look at it and reload and advance an extra frame (the beauty of the older cameras is that they are easy to fool when necessary!)
     
  13. pen s

    pen s Member

    Messages:
    241
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2011
    Location:
    Olympia, wa.
    Shooter:
    35mm
    My little Zeiss Nettar has an accessory shoe. That is where I fold the film box end and slip it in. But for now I'd just shoot at 100 and push or pull development as suggested.

    Looks like DW beat me to the post button.
     
  14. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Rodinal stand dev!
     
  15. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,229
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Been there; done that. There isn't too much of a loss, dollar-wise, so I stand with the "take it out and process it... and mark it next time" crowd. :smile:
     
  16. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,800
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've done this before. Just shoot at 100 and when you figure out what it is when you take the roll out of the camera develop appropriately. Or toss it and load a new roll.
     
  17. pbromaghin

    pbromaghin Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,940
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    Location:
    Castle Rock,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hey, I'm not cheap! I'm thrifty. But thanks, anyway.

    I discovered this by opening it to put in a new roll, so the 1st 3 shots are ruined. A check of the shutter and aperture settings suggests it's either PANF or FP4. So, I'll just shoot remaining 9 at 100. That's a good idea about stuffing the box end into the accessory shoe, if your camera has one. This Compur shutter doesn't even have a flash sync.

    Thanks to all.
     
  18. elekm

    elekm Member

    Messages:
    2,058
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2004
    Location:
    New Jersey (
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Happens to me all too often. I note the frame number. Put the camera into a changing bag and remove both the roll and takeup spool and wind the film back onto the roll so I can see what I have loaded. Then I reload the camera and try to use it before I forget again.

    If you don't have a changing bag, a winter coat will work. Just make sure that you zip it up and fold it so all openings are covered. Then slide your arms into the sleeves. Do this in a darkened room – don't turn on the lights.

    You can see that this has happened enough times that I have a procedure in place.
     
  19. wlewisiii

    wlewisiii Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    It's even easier if the only film you buy is ISO100 film... :wink:
     
  20. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,824
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Just shoot it a 100, and if it turns out to be 400 adjust the development. Not a big deal.
     
  21. SkipA

    SkipA Member

    Messages:
    604
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2002
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Refer to the sentence that I bolded above. If you are sure that it is either Pan F or FP4, then it would make more sense to expose it at 50 ASA. That'll be fine for either of those films.
     
  22. lacavol

    lacavol Member

    Messages:
    75
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It doesn't help now but:

    I've done this so often that I now use Avery (or any other brand) Removable multi-use labels. They don't leave adhesive on the camera and you can put the film type on almost any surface without damaging it. I usually put it on the bottom plate. 1000 5/8"X7/8" labels are cheap, just a few $. Good luck with the film. Now if I would only set my ISO before metering. :wink: