Oil Paints on Liquid Emulsions ?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by menglert, Sep 28, 2006.

  1. menglert

    menglert Member

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    I was thinking today it might be fun to try some oil paints on top of an exposed b&w liquid emulsion on watercolor papers.

    The idea is to coat the watercolor paper with Gesso (a type of acrylic base paint), then coat it with a b&w liquid emulsion and expose the picture. The reason for the layer of Gesso is to protect the paper from the oil paints applied later. After processing it in the darkroom, let it dry, then presumably I’d be free to paint on top of this with oil paints.

    Has anyone else tried this or foresee any problems with archival stability or processing?

    Regards,
    Martin
     
  2. raucousimages

    raucousimages Member

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    I have seen 20+ year old prints like this with no problems. Google Richard Prehn or Zxorb and look at his work. Some is Marshal oil, some is oil paint.
     
  3. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    Have you considered adding pigment directly to your liquid emulsion before or after applying it to the paper? I know that this would be a completely different effect.

    There was in Photo Tech magazine several years back an article on using acryllic paints in a silk screen type of process...if I remember correctly which is lees than likely.. and using manual scrubbing to remove selectively paint and multiple applications to achieve multi-colored effects that were quite graphic.
     
  4. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    I've painted with traditional artist's oils on fiber and on RC prints. I found it quite useful to lay down a thin layer of medium first and the paint into it. This gave me more freedom to clean up edges and work the surface without abrading the emulsion. Lots of fun!