Old Hasselblad lenses.

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by rayonline_nz, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. rayonline_nz

    rayonline_nz Member

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    I am planning to pick up a used Hasselblad. For the lenses I know there are the silver C lenses, some of which were not labelled but may have had the lens coating, then there was the black lenses with the C T* coating (was it ..) then the CFE lenses.

    I don't mind if they are not repairable by Hasselblad. I shoot colour slides and that is my final output. Mainbly cityscapes and landscapes, some portraiture but few. Basically what are the differences between these lenses?


    Many thanks.
     
  2. MDR

    MDR Member

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    The Silver C lenses are single coated and were produced from the mid fifties to about 1970/71, the C T. lenses have multicoating Zeiss T-coating both C and CT lenses use the Compur shutter parts problems might arise, Later came the CF line of lenses change to prontor shutter and some optical improvements. The CF line was followed by the CFE E standing for electronic bus. Hasselblad believe it or not introduced a line of budget lenses in the 1990's the CB.

    The C and CT lenses are optically great and are also the cheapest to buy. The best overall choice might be a mix of CF and CB lenses. If you have too much money get the CFE and CFI.

    Dominik
     
  3. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Member

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    I hated the old C and C T* lenses, because the aperture changing ring is a real pain to operate. The CF lenses went to a normal aperture ring, while the older ones require you to push out on a level on the ring to move the aperture, otherwise it is locked to the shutter ring (so moving aperture changes shutter speed too). The CF lenses have a button you can push if you want the aperture and shutter to move together, but its disengaged by default, while it is engaged by default on the older C/CT* lenses. The ergonomics of the old ones are so bad, that the CF lenses were worth paying the higher prices. Also, my 80mm C lens flared horribly, and the CF one never does (the CT* is probably ok too, but never tried it).

    Another consideration, if you want to get lenses other than the standard 80: Zeiss improved the 50mm lens during the CF era, so there is the original CF 50mm, which is optically the same as the older C/CT* models, and there is the 50mm CF-FLE that has floating elements. I may have had a bad sample, but my 50mm CF had terrible edge resolution, and the CF-FLE I use now is very sharp.
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    The C lenses use B50 filters. The CF and above lenses use B60 filters. If you start with C lenses and then buy a CF or newer lenses, you will have to buy another set of filters and both the B50 and B60 filters are expensive. Unless you are using a Hasselblad body with electronics, the CF lenses are your best buy. I only buy CF lenses.
     
  5. Slixtiesix

    Slixtiesix Subscriber

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    CF lenses offer the best bargain. If you might want a 60mm, have a look for the CB version too.
     
  6. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I have the 38mm [Hasselblad 903 SWC], 50mm, 80mm, 150mm and 250mm CF lenses. If I had not had the 80mm lens, I would have gotten the 38mm [Hasselblad 903 SWC], 50mm, 100mm, 150mm and 250mm CF lenses.
     
  7. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

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    Make sure the Compur shuttered C lenses don't have sticky slow speeds or oil on the blades (most common issues)
    I've also noticed over the years that early C lenses are more prone to separation than later lenses (still great lenses btw: the 80mm chrome Planar I've used had separation and still put out wonderful pics)
     
  8. mikebarger

    mikebarger Subscriber

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    I like my old chrome Hassy lens (50mm, 80mm, 150mm (favorite), 250mm. A couple have the red T*. Never used a CF so I guess I don't know what I'm missing. :smile:
     
  9. tony lockerbie

    tony lockerbie Subscriber

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    Don't fret buying the old single coated C lenses, I kind of prefer them...nice look to them as regards to image quality and the chrome just looks nice! Zeiss lenses just don't seem to need multi-coating as much as some others, the 80mm and 150mm that I have are just contrasty enough. The wide angles on the other hand can benefit from multi-coating due to many more elements and the higher risk of including a light source in your photo.
    As already stated, the aperture change is a pain, but you get used to it. Also the shutter on old lenses need checking as they get sticky, but a CLA on these old Compurs will have them good for another 40 years.