OLD Super-XX: how to handle?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Nathan Smith, Jul 27, 2008.

  1. Nathan Smith

    Nathan Smith Member

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    I recently bought an old Ernemann HEAG camera that came with a nearly unused pack of Super-XX. Thanks to Whitey Morange and others, I now know how to use the film pack. Next question: due to the unknown age of this film, what's the best way to shoot & develop it?

    Archived posts refer to very out-dated Super-XX losing it's effective speed from 200 down to 100 ASA. So I'm thinking of shooting it at 100 and dunking it in something like Acufine. There are a couple of sheets that were apparently exposed in the distant past so the Acufine might help with the unknown condition of them.

    There's a pretty good chance the stuff is beyond help, but I'm looking forward to trying it - any ideas?

    Thanks,
    Nathan
     
  2. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

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    How outdated is outdated?

    Ten years, at the most a bit more fog.

    Twenty years, lots more fog.

    I've not heard of B&W film losing speed, but then, I don't know everything.

    The film was intended to be developed in D96, from which negs then got printed on high contrast "print" film.

    I would suggest sticking close to the fundamentals, no Acufine or wild EI's. I would try several EI's in, what else, D-76 or D-23 or divided D-23. There's a great thread or two on 5222 and 5231 on www.rangefinder.com (I think that's it.)
     
  3. Nathan Smith

    Nathan Smith Member

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    Thanks Paul, it's potentially VERY old. I don't have any way of knowing, but this camera is from the 20's - Ernemann became part of Zeiss-Ikon in 1926, and it doesn't look like it ever got used much. I suspect the film is not quite THAT old, but it could possibly be from 1920-something on, maybe the 30's or 40's.

    With that in mind, it could be too fogged to work - or too stiff or brittle for the film pack to work.

    Nathan
     
  4. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    I know a photographer who has a stash of old Super-XX. He develops it in ABC Pyro and gets great results.
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I just recently used some Super XX from 1988 and sent several sheet to others here on APUG. They have used it just fine.

    I would use ISO 100 for it and 7 - 9 minutes in D-76. The fog will be a bit high but the images will be good.

    PE
     
  6. sun of sand

    sun of sand Member

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    I bought -it came with other stuff- an old Spartus 35 with an old roll of XX half exposed. I opened the back and figured I had ruined the exposures well enough to not try
    I'm going to shoot the other half and see what I get.
    No later than the early 70's

    I shoot some Plus-X in 4x5 from 1970 and get decent enough quality. I use it to practice on around here.

    I have used Xtol and D76 with anti-fog
    10ml -orthazite- or so per liter of solution
    This will lower the films speed even more but it reduces the fog considerably. I shoot the Plus X at around 20.
    I'll shoot the XX at around 30-50

    can also help reduce overexposure with anti-fog in that if happen to overexpose you can add the AF till the film speed lowers ..requiring the extra exposure
     
  7. Nathan Smith

    Nathan Smith Member

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    Thanks for the Orthazite tip, I hadn't heard of it - guess I never had any reason to notice until now. I'm sure this film must have incurred some base fogging.
    Nathan