old to new film cross reference??

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by SteveinAlaska, Nov 6, 2007.

  1. SteveinAlaska

    SteveinAlaska Member

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    I just received a camera guide booklet to use with my 1947 Zeiss Ikonta. Publication date on the booklet is 1957. Inside are the film types listed to use. In using these older cameras and referencing the old information that comes with them is there a cross reference on films that will take me from old to new by both brand and/or speed type? I know that in my 18 yrs as a mechanic, I would replace part A with updated part B or C after being that this was the way to go. I guess that I am trying to find the same thing here with film to use.
    I suppose I could go by trial and error but I would rather have some established information to save me some time and I don't want to reinvent the wheel( if you know what I mean).
    I appreciate the info that I find here and say a big Thank You to everyone here.:smile:
     
  2. Ray Heath

    Ray Heath Member

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    g'day Steve

    i don't understand the premise for your question

    unlike replacement machine parts you should be able to use any film that is of the right size

    film type, brand and speed are different issues, they don't relate to how the film phsically fits in the camera

    Ray
     
  3. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Steve,

    You could approach this in two ways:

    -) search for films that yield the same image qality (look) than those in that broschure,

    -) search for films of the same brand and speed as those listed; these will however most probably yield very different qualities.
     
  4. rwyoung

    rwyoung Member

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    There can't be so many listed you couldn't just type the name into Google and read a little bit?

    Otherwise, just get some 120 size FP4+ and be happy...
     
  5. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Cross referencing film from 1947 is like referencing gasoline from 1947, does the same thing, basically the same stuff, but a lot has changed in 60 years. The one contstance is that the faster the film the more grain. But modern fast films have better grain than many slow speed films of the 40s. Color film is vastly improved from the 40s.
     
  6. Akki14

    Akki14 Member

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    Basically what you want is ISO100ish film for sunny days, ISO400 for dull and cloudy days and maybe some delta3200 and be prepared to push it to 6400 for indoors shots. This is what I do for all my low-tech vintage cameras (while using a handheld light meter to change shutter/aperture if needed).
     
  7. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    You use it as you would any manual camera, using the film speed loaded to calculate your chosen exposure. If you are seeking a look close to the films contemporary to the camera, try shooting some Efke 25, or 100 through it.

    Congrats on your new camera!