Older Canon EOS

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by TimJ, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. TimJ

    TimJ Member

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    Hello,
    I'm looking at getting a 35mm after playing with a polaroid land camera for a while. I'd rather learn to develop 35mm then keep paying for polaroid film.
    I've thought about getting a Pentax Spotmatic but I'm not very confident in my exposure knowledge yet so I'd like to have something to start off with that has some programming.

    What I'm wondering about is if the older EOSes are worth trying. The 620/630/650 are inexpensive even through places like KEH. I'm not big on cameras with lots of gadgets but these look fairly basic.
    Are they good (I know they are older and can have issues) for a 35mm beginner or should I look for a later Elan 7 or something like that?

    I've searched and read a lot on here but it is tough to come up with info on three character searches like '620' or 'eos'. Sort of gets swamped when searching for 'canon'.
    Thanks for any help.

    Tim
     
  2. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    I looked into the same question and concluded that they should be fine, although ultimately I ended up with a Rebel X (no gadgets at all and even cheaper, but a newer body with perhaps some metering upgrades and so on). I mean, they all keep the dark in, right? Unless you have specific needs---say, for extreme shutter speeds or unusual metering modes---I think you're fine with any EOS body.

    -NT
     
  3. X. Phot.

    X. Phot. Guest

    There is an issue with the EOS 650/620/630 group of cameras that "might" give you problems in time. That's a big "might". It all revolves around the deterioration of a rubber bumper for the shutter. Over years the rubber turns into a sticky gummy mass and adheres itself to the shutter blades, ultimately rendering the shutter inoperable. It is an easy fix on most cameras, but if you're not up for the headaches you might want to steer towards a newer model EOS. I love my EOS 630 to death, and use it most every day, but I had to clean the shutter blades and clean out that "evil gummy bear" when I first received the camera. I don't think the ELAN 7 ever had any troubles, and I am tempted to purchase one myself. I also have the Rebel G, but consider it more of a disposable slr, and very toy-like.
     
  4. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Have you considered the FD system?

    Jeff
     
  5. X. Phot.

    X. Phot. Guest

    P.S. Should you decide to purchase a 650/620 or 630 and it turns out to have the "gummy bear issue", I will gladly describe the procedure I used to fix mine. Granted, they can be repaired professionally for probably 3-4 times the value of the camera. But, if it's a toss-up between the landfill and a DIY repair, all you really need is gumption, alcohol, ronsonol lighter fluid, q-tips, and typing paper.
     
  6. mcgrattan

    mcgrattan Member

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    I had a EOS 650 which had the same problem. I cleaned the gunk off with some alcohol and q-tips without any problems. I really liked the EOS 650, it had a good combination of features, a decent-enough finder, and metered reliably even with older manual focus lenses using adapters.

    It depends what lenses you have, also. There are inexpensive SLRs with good metering in other lens mounts, too. I'm partial to the M and P series Pentaxes, for example.
     
  7. sandermarijn

    sandermarijn Member

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    The EOS 620 is one of my favourite EOS cameras; never had the mirror bumper problem. It has a feeling of heft and fits the (my) hand much better than the smaller, more plasticky Rebels.

    A big plus also is that you can change the focusing screen, a feature usually reserved for high-end models (the 620 was pretty high-end in 1987). This is a great feature for manual focusing with adapter-fitted non-EOS lenses.

    Another thing I like is how the 620 definitely does not resemble any current digital EOS. Some people stare at this camera seemingly wondering "did I miss the latest Canon DSLR announcement?".

    Ideally you should try to get your hands on a 620/650 before buying. OTOH they're not very expensive so you can't lose much.

    Also, have a look in Canon's camera museum for comparing features and for a nice read.
     
  8. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    I'd go for an EOS A2E if you can find one.
     
  9. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    I am not familiar with the Canon EOS line of camera. I just want to comment on your thought of getting a camera with some automation as you're not sure about your exposure skill. I would like to point out that it doesn't take any more skill to use a fully manual camera than a fully automatic camera. The difference is that with a manual camera it is slower as you will have to supply your muscle to make the adjustment. The built in light meter will guide you on how to set exposure so there is no difficulty here.
     
  10. TimJ

    TimJ Member

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    Thank you all. I don't currently have an SLR so I'm starting without having to fit a camera to lenses I already have. Part of the reason I was thinking about the eos line is that there are a lot of lenses and they are still being manufatured. Sounds like they are worth a try.

    I still have some reading to do but this helped a lot.

    Tim
     
  11. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Tim,
    What is budget?
    The 1n is a very good deal considering what you get for the money.
     
  12. mr rusty

    mr rusty Member

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    In my opinion, the reason to choose an EOS camera over a more traditional SLR is whether you want to use auto focus or not. With regard to exposure, any camera with exposure automation is pretty much "point and shoot" in many/most situations. Certainly in daylight an aperture priority "traditional" SLR set to F8 or F11 is most likely going to set a useable shutter speed. As far as EOS, I have an EOS 300v/rebel Ti, and these are as cheap as chips and work perfectly with all (I think) of the EOS lenses. I much prefer my OMs, but the 300v is handy when I want fast auto focus.
     
  13. TimJ

    TimJ Member

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    The 1n would probably be a little more then I'd like to spend on a body. Even the Elan 7 probably has a little more 'stuff' then I want to start with. Trying to stay simple unless I find a deal I can't resist.
    I really want to keep it under $150 for a body and ok starter lens. I hope that is a realistic goal. Not looking at anything fancy to start with.

    Tim
     
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  15. X. Phot.

    X. Phot. Guest

    I just found this review on the Elan 7. As I only use M42 mount lenses, not supporting manual lenses would kill my desire to own one. But, I would love to get my hands on one to try and prove/disprove that observation.

    http://photonotes.org/reviews/eos-elan-7/
     
  16. WilsonImages

    WilsonImages Member

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    my favorite EOS film is the RT, its the same as the 630 but with no mirror black out when you take the picture, so like a rangefinder, you can actually see the moment of exposure..todd
     
  17. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    TimJ I tried to do a private message but I messed up. You look up AE-1, A-1 or the F-1 , FTb all are good bodies.

    Jeff
     
  18. Matthew Wagg

    Matthew Wagg Member

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    I have a 650 and it's a lovely camera. It does now suffer from the gummy bear sticky shutter, so it's in drydock until I can get around to sorting it. I would heartily recommend the eos5 as it is one heck of a camera for the cash. Its lighting fast af, fantastic metering, super bright finder and a similar size to the 650. Its also whisper quiet and by far my favourite canon I own.
    If you add in the vertical grip, though the eye controlled focus doesn't work in portrait it makes shooting portrait an absolute pleasure.
     
  19. segedi

    segedi Member

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    Tim - I have a Rebel G that I'd gladly give you for the cost of postage. I'm sending from Canada though. I have 2 other Canon film cameras and this one is in excess to my needs. And it comes with a neato pinhole body cap!
    Let me know...
     
  20. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    I've actually got a full Rebel G EOS kit for sale in the Classifieds. I should probably drop the price on it a tad.

    That being said, I would keep it if I didn't already have two 650's and a Rebel Ti
     
  21. TimJ

    TimJ Member

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    Thank you Jeff. Even if I don't find one that meets my needs for right now I'm going to keep an eye out for one. They do look like a nice system.

    Tim
     
  22. TimJ

    TimJ Member

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    Thanks everyone. Lots of good info for me to think about.

    Tim
     
  23. spacer

    spacer Subscriber

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    The Rebel X and Xs are the bottom-of-the-bucket bargains these days. You can get 'em for next to nothing, and my old Rebel X with its cheap kit lens has produced some very nice images. For your price range, you could grab one (the Xs has a flash, the X doesn't) and a decent lens or three for starters.

    I also have an A2E in addition to my dSLR Rebel and 60D, but the X is so light and handy that it competes favorably with my Canonet as a discreet "street" camera with the EF 50/1.8 on it.
     
  24. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I have a couple of Rebel 2000s that can be had at very reasonable prices :smile:.
     
  25. dances_w_clouds

    dances_w_clouds Subscriber

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    I would not be looking to spend any bucks on a body but dedicating my $$'s to the EF lenses. Those L lenses are expensive, even the used variety. They make some very affordable in the US version.
     
  26. j-dogg

    j-dogg Subscriber

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    I've got a couple of those L lenses. They really are worth every penny, if you can afford one.

    I've got the 24-105 F4L IS and the venerable 70-200 F4L IS, both fantastic pieces of glass. The next on the addition block will be the 85 f1.2L II

    The great thing about the EOS 35mm line is you can put an L lens on a cheap 5 or 10 dollar EOS film camera and still take a bad ass photo with it. I got a photo somewhere of my Rebel Ti with the 70-200 f4L IS on it.