Oldest Color negative/positive on the market?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by /dev/null, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. /dev/null

    /dev/null Member

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    I need to do a bandshoot soon that has a bit of that 60-ies British beat / Mercy beat sound. I would like to try to get that look and feel of those 60ies color images as much as possible. I use old camera's on 120mm format, thought maybe the Kodak Ektar of Kodak VC (still have some of that) could do the job. I know this is really a question of taste, so I thought I'd look for film that was on the market in the sixties and is still available. I did some google searches but couldn't find the answer really. I will use it for the scan mainly and not really want to Photoshop my way through, better to have the results caught on film as much as possible. Thanks.
     
  2. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    Hi,
    A matter of choice as you say, but I think that Fuji Pro 400H has quite a nice look to it that is reminiscent of older photographs.
    Tom.
     
  3. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    I don't think that you will find any film from the 1960's which is still available which is anything like it was then. The two main types of color negative at that time were the Kodacolor-type and the Agfacolor-type, both of which used different basic color couplers and processing procedures. There were similar products from smaller makers, particularly the European manufacturers, which based their film on Agfa information released after WW2.

    However, present C-41 films from Kodak and Fuji use a different process from those in the 60's, whereas the Agfa process is effectively obsolete.

    Unless you were to take the complicated way of actually finding old film from that time, then some way of formulating the process chemicals (not impossible, but not easy, and rather unreliable), I think that Tom's suggestion of a near-match from a modern film and post-post processing should work. I've seen quite a few examples in magazines, and even digital video processed to look like old Kodachrome home movies!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 15, 2012
  4. /dev/null

    /dev/null Member

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    Thanks. That Fuji Pro400H is a nice one indeed and I like the colors a lot.

    I've been thinking on using a real, old and obsolete one, I still have some very old Kodak, but like you say, it is quite unreliable and not really taking a risk and messing it up. I might set up two camera's and have one of them set up with an old and obsolete Kodak one, to minimize the risk, I still have some shots on the Fuji400.
     
  5. tomalophicon

    tomalophicon Member

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    You could also print on old paper. I've found that is another way of introducing some vintage effects into your pictures. There are a few in my gallery.