Olympus Trip 35

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by Galah, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. Galah

    Galah Member

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    This compact little camera was, apparently, a marketing miracle in its day selling around 10 million (i.e. 10,000,000) units over several years.

    Essentially, it was/is a fully automatic point and shoot (except for the need to -at least- "zone" focus).

    It is "powered" by a large Selenium cell which surrounds the lens inside the filter-ring, resulting effectively in a "kind of" TTL "equivalent" metering. This also "powers" whatever it is that sets the aperture (2.8 to 22) and shutter speed (choice of either 1/40th or 1/200th sec). Consequently, there are no batteries: great! There is also a "hot shoe" for a simple one-pin flash (this works OK).

    When using the camera, one can observe that it selects and holds the aperture and shutter speed (i.e the exposure) as one depresses the shutter release prior to releasing the shutter itself: thus it has -effectively- an "exposure lock".

    The camera is relatively compact and well constructed of aluminium and glass with a few plastic components (not virtually totally plastic, as is the case these days) and has a nice "solid" feel to it.

    The 43mm lens is noticeably sharp (zone focusing and all). Ken Rockwell, on his site, compares it more than advantageously to his Canon "L" lenses in resolution (http//www.kenrockwell.com/olympus/trip-35.htm , worth a read).

    This is all the more surprising, since the iris consists of only two V-shaped blades which move across each other to vary the size of the aperture.

    One would imagine that such a "primitive" iris would give an odd image: not so, the image is absolutely superb (my opinion, shared by Ken Rockwell).

    I was fortunate, some weeks ago, to find three of these cameras for sale (at Aus$8-00 each) in a "junk" shop and picked out the two that were in working order (one of which included a lens-shade and both came with UV/skylight filters and -somewhat tatty, but functional- cloth "cases").

    I have since put a couple of 400 ISO films through each of them with more than satisfactory results.

    They are extremely easy to use and -in my opinion- would make excellent "street shooting" and general "have one with you at all times" cameras. If you see one, get it!

    So many cameras, so little time!!!!!:D
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 11, 2009
  2. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    The aperture is set by the light value, but I'm fairly sure the shutter speed is always at 1/200 in A mode. The manual mode is designed for flash, not manual shooting. It closes the aperture more or less based on the amount of light while in the "manual" mode. Only in manual flash mode does it use the 1/40 second shutter speed IIRC.

    It's a great camera. I have one in my point and shoot collection. I read somewhere that the iris shape does not effect the image itself. I believe it effects bokeh (?) and I know it effects sunstars. Other than that I don't think it's bad.
     
  3. Tony Egan

    Tony Egan Subscriber

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    It was my first ever camera. I also liked being able to shoot in "manual" mode or I guess more correctly shutter priority mode by using the aperture settings intended for flash use at the fixed shutter speed of 1/40th of a second. For a lot of night or low light shots I used to just set it at f2.8 and see what happened.
     
  4. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    They were verry well build and easy to repair too.
    I had a few in for repairs over the years: oil between the shutterblades and sometimes a loose or missing screw.
    Great camera, I should have one laying around somewhere, should take some pic's with it.

    Peter
     
  5. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    Here's a great way to test the meter on a Trip 35.Set the exposure dial to A,cock the shutter,cover the lens and press the shutter release button.If the shutter fires the meter is toast.
    I tweaked my Trip to fire at 1/200 without a working meter.Darned if I can find the article.Maybe someone else has it.Very easy steps to follow.Default shutter speed on a Trip is 1/40.Almost useless.
     
  6. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    With it set on A, half press the shutter whilst looking into the lens. You should see the aperture change. Try it in bright light and in your own shadow. In bright light it should be closed down and in shadow it should open up.

    This camera has a meter with a needle which you cant see. When you half press the shutter, the mechanism for moving the aperture blades jams up against the needle with an angled plate. The amount of light dictates where along the angled piece the needle rests and therefore dictates the aperture opening.



    Steve.
     
  7. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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  8. epavelin

    epavelin Member

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    The shutter fires at either 1/200 or 1/40 in A mode- it's actually a primitive form of programmed exposure. You can hear the difference in the shutter speed if you take a shot pointing at a bright light followed by one of a darker scene. It's a great camera.
     
  9. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    google 'trip 35 modify' I have two of these cameras, and it is just a matter of time before I get one of them modifed to shoot at 1/200. I have had one apart to fix a broken resistor, and now both are working fine on auto.
     
  10. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    Ha! did that and the first thing that came up on Google was this thread!

    Steve
     
  11. Peter Black

    Peter Black Subscriber

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  12. Paul.

    Paul. Member

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    Baught my first one new in Dixons back in the early 70s cost £25.00
    Baught my last one at a camera fair 2 years ago £8.00. Both still working
    fits in jacket pocket take it everywhere, lend to grandchildren, wonderful cameras.
    Regards Paul.
     
  13. thuggins

    thuggins Member

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    The Trip 35 is a wonderful camera, and one of the most successful models ever produced. As such, it deserves a more accurate description than the one given above. I posted both an accurate description of the camera and repair instructions at a while back at:

    http://www.thermojetstove.com/Trip35

    The comment about the diamond shaped aperture having no affect on image quality is correct. This only influences "bokeh".

    Also, care should be taken with the shutter speed modification. If the meter is working, this will cause incorrect exposure when the light level wants to set the shutter speed to 1/40.
     
  14. RobertV

    RobertV Member

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    The Olympus Trip 35 was my first 35mm camera. I still have it. The lens is amazing good and the camera is well build.

    Regards,

    Robert
     
  15. Mark Antony

    Mark Antony Member

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    It was the first camera I ever used and the camera that fueled my interest in photography, if any camera can claim to be a 'Volkscamera' it's the Trip. I bought one for my son and was surprised by the sharp lens and fairly accurate auto meter.
    Blog post here:
    http://photo-utopia.blogspot.com/2008/03/olympus-trip-35.html
     
  16. tomswanboroughnilson

    tomswanboroughnilson Member

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    Another fan of the Trip 35 here, I have had several (at my peak I think I owned 4), but am now down to one (with the hard ERC which I managed to find at a flea market in Helsinki).
    They are an absolute delight to use, it was my carry-everywhere camera, took it to America, took one to Finland, shot many rolls through them (http://flickr.com/photos/tomswanboroughnilson/sets/72157600169108826/).

    I highly recommend one of these to anyone.
     
  17. Galah

    Galah Member

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    Dear tomswanboroughnilson,

    Hear, hear!
    I have just received another set of prints of a film put through my "newer" Trip35. Boy, is the exposure spot on and are the prints sharp! You would imagine they were taken with a very expensive DSLR and Lens, yet they were taken with an $8-00 junkshop Trip35, which probably hasn't had a CLA in it's life.