One more time 8x10, question

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Troy Ammons, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. Troy Ammons

    Troy Ammons Member

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    Originally I thought I would not want to hike more than about 500 feet with one of these monsters, but now I am thinking I actually might like to shlep one of these things around occasionally. I picked up a Cambo 8x10 and its nice and stiff but it is heavy and bulky.

    Now what I want is something of good quality,

    That is.........

    Reasonably stiff and will lock down and wont move when inserting a filmholder.
    Weighs about 10-12#.
    Is moderatly priced, at maybe $1000-$2500 used. I expect I am going to have to pay for lightweight high quality.
    Something that folds up and is compact.

    I guess the first camera that comes to mind is the Canham, followed by the Wisner, Wista and less expensive and I am sure less quality Shen Hao and tachihara cameras.

    I would rather have something realtively new, but I would not discount a Deardorff or the like. I guess I would consider a Kodak Master View too

    Any opinions.
     
  2. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    Deardorff, no front swings. Cheap, light.

    Kodak 2 D.
     
  3. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Gandolfi Variant, weight 4 kg (8 lb), price (used, from Gandolfi) GBP 1500.-.
     
  4. Steve Hamley

    Steve Hamley Member

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  5. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    <soapbox>
    I haven't tried a Shen-Hao 8x10 yet, but I wouldn't bash them out of hand like that. For starters, the Shen-Hao 8x10 actually has titanium bits, not just pot metal. Second, having worked with the 4x5, it is remarkably solid.
    </soapbox>

    The above being said, I think my first choice for an 8x10 would be a Canham, for the light weight and easy portability. If I get to China before I decide to upgrade my 8x10, I'll visit Shanghai and see the Shen Hao factory, and see if I can get a better price on it locally. If not, it's a Canham for sure.
     
  6. Troy Ammons

    Troy Ammons Member

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    You know I just looked at a Wehman on line and it looks really nice. I only would question how stiff it is.

    Does anybody here have any experience at all with one ??
     
  7. Steve Hamley

    Steve Hamley Member

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    Troy,

    Allegedly it is very stiff because the base is a "U" shaped piece of metal.

    Do a search on Wehman on APUG and lfinfo. Bruce likes to say he's never seen one on eBay - and as far as I can tell, that's true.

    Steve
     
  8. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    I have an 8x10 Wehman and I love it. It is plenty stiff with lenses up to and including 480mm. The shortest lens I use on it is my Schneider 110mm XL SS (infinity focus on a flat lens board).

    I back pack my Wehman in a Kelty Redwing 3100 internal frame backpack. Camera, lenses, film holders, BlackJacket, etc. are all carried inside the pack. Tripod/Ballhead on the outside.
     
  9. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    Between a Canham and a Gandolfi I would go with the Canham. Gandolfi has terrible customer service, or at least this has been my experience in the last month trying to get a Sinar front standard for my 8x10.

    Canham has wonderful customer service and the Gandolfi Variant is not any better than his cameras. If it wasnt because I would loose too much money I would trade mine in for a Canham in a heartbeat.
     
  10. sattler123

    sattler123 Member

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    I do have the 8x10 Wehman as well and it is perfect for Backpacking. It is very solid, yet very light weight. It weighs just over 8 pounds!! It is not a camera for people who love to brag about the looks of their cameras. As Bruce Wehman said to me - there's the Canham crowd and then there's the Wehman crowd, BUT it is everything you would ever want in a landscape camera. If you do a lot of architecture, then this camera is not for you because of the limited rise on it. Call Bruce and talk to him - he is very helpful and won't tell you any BS.
     
  11. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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  12. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    I'm partial to Kodak Master 8x10's. Real partial.
     
  13. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It's not for everyone, but if you like monorails and you're willing to sacrifice certain conveniences for light weight and maybe do a little tweaking for some extra rigidity, the Gowland 8x10" PocketView is a very backpackable camera. I carry mine with 3-5 holders, 6 lenses, darkcloth, meter, filters and usual extras in an ordinary knapsack designed for laptop computers. Tripod goes on a shoulder strap, and a lighter camera means you can carry a lighter tripod. Usually I carry a heavier Bogen 3233 and Gitzo G 1570M head, but I can get away with a Tiltall for travel.
     
  14. mikewhi

    mikewhi Member

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    I have owned a KMV and I now own a Canham 8x10. I love the KMV, too, but I always found the front standard could not handle real heavy lenses. The Canham is very rigid but even it will shake some in a heavy wind (doesn't every view camera?).

    I have a f64 backpack for my 8x10 outfit and I have schlepped it all over the place, even up and down huge sand dunes. I now have a convertible lens so that really reduces the weight. You would have a very lightweight outfit with a Canham 8x10 and a few lwell-selected enses.

    A KMV is a great choice, too. You'll just be giving up some bellows draw and a slightly weaker front standard. But if your lenses aren't big and heavy (like 2 or 3 lbs), then you'd be ok. And the KMV on the used market costs about 30% of what a new Canham costs.

    -Mike
     
  15. raucousimages

    raucousimages Member

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    A Toyo 810M can be found for about $1000. thry are great camera's. I love my Toyo's (7 of them right now, long story) but if I had to do it again I would own a Canham 4x5 and 8x10 with a 5x7 reducing back.
     
  16. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    You want to sell one?
     
  17. Dave Wooten

    Dave Wooten Subscriber

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    Toyo is a favorite of mine....have a Wista 8 x 10 but only 24 inches on bellows....it is btw very light weight 10 lbs......I also use Toyo 8 x 10 monorail at times it has 1200mm of bellows...I like the attachments etc with this system....

    On one desert trip using a Canham 11 x 14, (beautiful camera) in 104 degree heat, the metal lens board on the Canham, actually a Toyo, expanded in the heat more rapidly that the wood on the camera! We had to remove the back and it was a struggle to push lensboard and lens from inside the bellows....
     
  18. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    Troy,

    Where do you want to move this camera around? If you want to climb rocks or stairs I can’t help you. If you want to go on trails, fields, dirt or gravel roads, and hills consider something to carry the camera and pack. I just came back from a week on the trails of Acadia National Park in Maine. Some times I set up out of the back of my SUV, but if I wanted to go any distance from the parking area I put my camera on the tripod and strapped it on top of a Tenba bag full of gear seated in my baby jogger. Up to ten film holders go in a bag under the seat, strapped to the frame. The jogger has 20” wheels, shock absorbers, a lockable brake and a capacity of 100 pounds. That is one fat baby. http://www.babyjogger.com/ There are other brands and styles. I got mine on eBay.

    For a solid, rigid or flexible, eight pound, 8x10, well built camera with good service, look to RH Phillips and sons. Dick only takes orders the first ten days of the year and new is too pricey for your stated budget, but again I got mine on eBay. Dick also hears of used cameras for sale once in a while and will pass that on if you ask.

    Good luck,

    John Powers