Options for 500 speed shutter

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by stradibarrius, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    When shooting outside in bright light and the camera has 1/500 speed as fastest shutter speed, what are options when you want to shoot with the lens wide open?

    ND filters?
    Slow film?
     
  2. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    Either, or both

    Look at Pan F or FP4. Depending upon how bright it is you may still need a ND filter.

    Also, I want to add that depending on your shutter 1/500 shutter speed may not be the most reliable or accurate shutter speed. Maybe shoot for 1/250 or 1/125 even.
     
  3. BrianL

    BrianL Member

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    Either but, as I almost never shoot a film faster than the 100 ISO range, it is almost never an issue for me. With my camera, I can swap backs and usually carry several films on any shoot. I also have a range of ND filters form 2 through 6 but actually very seldom carry them unless I am going out with a larger kit.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    ND filters, slow film, adjusted (pull) processing... or wait for more appropriate light.
     
  5. TimmyMac

    TimmyMac Subscriber

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    Yes
    Yes

    Although this is the #2 reason I'm lusting for a Hassy 2000FCW (#1 is the 110/2!)
     
  6. stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    My RB67 has a shutter speed of 400, My Bronica ETRS has a 500 max speed, my M645 is 500 but my M645 1000S is 1000. All of my 35mm bodies are at least 1000 so I am mainly concerned with my RB and the ETRS.
    I have never used any of the ASA25 or 50 speed films. I like the look of Tri-X, Hp5 and Px125.
    With that in mind what are your favorite "slow" films?
     
  7. R gould

    R gould Member

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    Either, you can use ND filters or use a film like panf aor the adox art25,Richard
     
  8. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    You can also use a film with lots of latitude and simply overexpose. A negative film might give very acceptable results when overexposed several stops. I've been known to shoot tri-x in my 35mm cameras with the lens wide open at 1/1000s in sunlight That's about 5 stops overexposed, but if I want a blurred background that's what I have to do and the pictures usually turn out rather printable.
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Shoot Plus-X at EI 64.

    A polarizing filter makes a good ND filter too.
     
  10. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    If you cannot do it using the holy trifecta of shutter speed, f stop, and film speed, then you have to control the intensity of the light reaching the lens by using other methods, of which neutral density is probably the most effective. A basic photography textbook will tell you all about it, and more.
     
  11. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I just remove the film back with the ISO 400 film [black & white or color] and replace it with film back that has the ISO 100 or 160 film [black & white or color as appropriate]. Why is this a problem? Hasselblad solved this problem in 1948! :smile:

    Steve