Options for Tachihara 4x5

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by daleeman, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. daleeman

    daleeman Member

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    Can anyone inform me about options I may have for using my Tachihara 4x5 with a roll film back? I have interest in doing panoramas and without buying something really expensive such as a stand alone camera or modifying the Tachihara are their any options out there?

    Also, what is the workflow for using 120 film on a 4x5. Like
    6x9,
    6x17?
    6x WOW? What formats exist?
    Determining just where on the GG to compose?
    Can you make a view card to see the framing with out setting up the camera?
    Any special limitations for swings or tilts?
    Number of images a roll.
    Getting scans or getting prints from a pro lab if possible? (Can not do color but would like too)

    Any experience out there with night shot panoramas?

    Thanks for any insights and lessons learned.
    Lee
     
  2. 36cm2

    36cm2 Member

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    You can use insert type rollfilm backs. The Calumet C2 is the most inexpensive way to go. It's 6x7. Or you can look for the more expensive Sinar insert backs. They come in 6x7, 6x9 and multi forms. The multi version allows you to switch between 6X7, 6x9 and 6x12 in the middle of a roll. It's significantly more expensive than the dedicated formats in my experience. I have both a calumet and a sinar. The sinar certainly feels nicer and inspires more confidence than the calumet, but I can't say I've had any problem with the calumet at all.
     
  3. Maris

    Maris Member

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    I occasionally use a "23" Graflex 6x9 roll-film back on my Tachihara 45GF.

    The roll film holder is mounted on a home made adapter that replaces the ground glass back of the Tachihara. In use the image is focussed and framed on the regular ground glass which has been marked out with 6x9 format lines. Then the sliding clips that hold the ground glass back on are opened, the GG back is taken off, the RF back and adapter are put on, and the exposure made. The whole process is a little cumbersome in the field but in view camera work speed is usually not a priority. Making the adapter needed only basic woodworking skills although getting the film plane and ground-glass plane to coincide exactly needs some subtle shimming.

    If I am after a faster sequence of exposures I use a Toyo 6x9 sliding back on the Tachi. This is adapted to the camera in a similar way to the "23" Graflex back but because it has its own ground glass screen it doesn't have to be taken on and off the camera between shots. I don't have a Toyo 6x9 roll film holder so I just use a Mamiya RB67 back and get 10 shots on a roll instead of 8. Because the sliding back has some stand-off from the rear of the Tachi short focal length lenses (90mm for example) can't be brought to infinity focus; 210mm works fine.
     
  4. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Subscriber

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    In the past I had a darkslide that I cut down to a little over half and used it to make two panoramic images per 4X5 sheet. It does require turning the back and keeping track of what has been shot, but I enjoyed it. I have recently gotten back into 4X5 and think I might try that again. It is a bit of a workaround, but it is almost free if you happen to have a spare dark slide.
     
  5. daleeman

    daleeman Member

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  6. Adrian Twiss

    Adrian Twiss Member

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    I have a similar back manufactured by Shen Hao except mine will also do 6x45,6x6 and 6x9. It is quite a rudimentary device that relies on a window to correctly wind on. However it is well made and does not leak and seems to hold the film flat. From your original post I suspect your camera does not have a Graflock (International) back so unfortunately this will not work. You are limited to backs that can be inserted such as the calumet and Sinar.
     
  7. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

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    My Wista field does not have an international back so, just like Maris I use an adapter. I have a Shen Hao 6x17 back and use one adapter for the film holder and one for the ground glass.
    I you have access to a good table saw and some 7mm plywood it takes about 30 minutes to make a couple of adapters (the second set will take about 5 minutes).
     
  8. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    Of course you could just use a selective enlargement of parts of your existing 5x4 negatives

    There is no reason to buy any additional kit

    Martin
     
  9. daleeman

    daleeman Member

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    Strong point, selective cropping is cheaper.
     
  10. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    And gives you greater flexibility with the compositions in the darkroom

    Martin :smile:
     
  11. Gary Tarbert

    Gary Tarbert Member

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    Hi, One of the reasons i use a roll film back for E6 films is the vast difference in proccessing costs 1 5x4 sheet is $13.00 1 120 roll is 11.50 the 120 is 6 shots the sheet only of course 1 so it does not take that long to add up . Of course with B&W i take the very same approach to yourself and enjoy working with the larger Neg .Cheers Gary