Orthochromatic film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Mainecoonmaniac, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,960
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'm thinking of experimenting with orthochromatic film. Is the film has the same color sensitivity has BW paper? If so, may I soup the film under a safe light similar to BW papers? Do you meter the film just like panochromatic film?
     
  2. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,536
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You can usually use a relatively dim red safelight if the film is slow but be sure to test for fogging and safe time. The spectral sensitivity of most Ortho films is not sharp cutting, nor is the spectral transmission of most safelights, so testing is important to make sure you have enough safe time depending on what you're doing with it. I use ortho film for masking so I need to see what I'm doing, and need a relatively long safe time. If you're using it in-camera you might as well treat it like any other film and process it in the dark to be safest. My two cents.
     
  3. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,996
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  4. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,191
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Metering is the same, but you have to remember that the film has very different speeds for daylight and tungsten light. You may sometimes need to take into account the film's lack of sensitivity to red light with certain subjects. Filter factors are also quite different.
     
  5. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,307
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Location:
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Play with some x-ray film -- it is ortho and cheap. I cut to size under a red safe light, load it into my holders and develop it under a red safelight. Though it might pick up extra sensitivity in the developer, so you might want to reduce the safe light once you put the film in the developer.

    I did not know one of my boys had many freckles until I did a portrait of him on 8x10 x-ray film! He was wearing red clothes, too.

    Calder
    Platinum/palladium print
    X-ray film
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,960
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hey thanks for all the great advice. I'm going to have to look for some X-ray film. When film is cheap, it makes it easier to experiment and play.
     
  7. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,164
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I use xray film a lot. It is okay under amber coloured safelight as well. I order from cxsonline. Are you going to be contact printing? Please note that this film has emulsion on both sides and that may reduce sharpness a bit when enlarging. Some people remove the rear emulsion with bleach. I contact print so don't bother bleaching.
     
  8. steven_e007

    steven_e007 Member

    Messages:
    829
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Shropshire,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Some ortho film is quite fast. Ilford Ortho is about ISO 80 - so WAY faster than paper. It seems to be a bit sensitive to red, too. I have developed it under a deep ruby red safelight at a long distance from the lamp, but my usual, brighter and 'more red' darkroom lights would fog it. To be honest, the deep red light is too dim to see much, though, so why bother? I prefer to use time development, it is what I'm used to.

    The kodak lith film I've got is much, much slower and you can play with that under normal red safelights.
     
  9. winger

    winger Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,898
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Location:
    southwest PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    What developer do people use for X-ray film?

    I have a few sheets of Arista ortholith left and I guess I can't buy more. I like that I can use my paper developer (Ilford multigrade).
     
  10. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,307
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Location:
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    The portraits I did of my boys was with the blue-sensitive x-ray film. The boys were in open shade. I exposed a set at 400ASA and at 800ASA. The film was processed at the hospital's x-ray lab, so I had no control there. I used the set exposed at 800 ASA as the 400ASA set was very dense. However, get this film into the dense forest, and the working ASA drops like a rock.

    The x-ray film scratches very easily during processing, so that has to be watched. I develop x-ray film in the same developer as my conventional films (ilford PQ Universal), some folks use pryo developers, too.

    Bryce
    8x10 Platinum/palladium Print
    x-ray film

    And the same again with Alex...
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2011
  11. cmo

    cmo Member

    Messages:
    1,457
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    If you just want the look of an ortho film you can use any panchromatic film and put a blue filter on the lens, it creates the same effect.
     
  12. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,536
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    This is quite true. It can be an excellent alternative to ortho films, many of which are slow, high contrast emulsions.
     
  13. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

    Messages:
    6,246
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2010
    Location:
    Southern USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    A blue filter will duplicate the look of an unsensitized emulsion. A green filter will approximate the look of orthochromatic film. But for the best redition you need to use a minus red filter. If you look at the color wheeel you will see that this is a cyan filter.
     
  14. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

    Messages:
    2,144
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I don't leave the house to photograph w/o both Ilford Ortho and Lith film in addition to the FP4+ which is always present.
    For me Ilford EI is 80 in daylight and 50 in tungsten.Lith film is 6 and 4 respectively.
    There is nothing like these films for opening up the shadows, particularly in forest scenes. For portraits it is necessary to remember that reds will print as black. I develop by inspection with a red safelight.
     
  15. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,536
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wratten 44A is sometimes used. It's essentially a minus-red.
     
  16. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,960
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for all the wonderful tips. The film is cheap enough for me to play. Xray film offers interesting possibilities. I like the idea of souping the film under a dim safelight. No excuse for badly processed ortho film.
     
  17. AmandaTom

    AmandaTom Member

    Messages:
    69
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Location:
    Novato, Cali
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I've been playing with aerographic duplicating film. I bought a 500 foot roll of the stuff and an 8x9.5 inch sheet costs me about 40 cents. I have rated the film at ISO 5 and meter through a blue filter. Then I develop it under a red safelight (tray) in Ansco 130 for a whole minute. Really quick, really cheap, and so far really interesting, especially with fair-skinned people or at times of low light.