Overwhelmed!! But anxious :))

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by MrRgoyer, Sep 18, 2011.

  1. MrRgoyer

    MrRgoyer Member

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    Hey all!!! I know I haven't been on here in ages!! And when I was I wasn't that active but I'm back and ready to go crazy :smile: just life stuff kept me away getting married moving awesome stuff like that :smile:)

    Anyways..

    I'm posting this thread because I want to get into developing my own 35mm film!! I'm super stoked about this!! I just have a few questions that I hope you fine folks would help me with.

    I'm not quite sure what chemicals to purchase. I know what I need developer,fixer,stop bath. I'm just not sure which brands...I read about using caffenol as a developer it sounded interesting to me. I just wanted to get some insight from some fellow apuggers as to what chemicals I should start out with.

    Next question.. I have a roll of Ilford HP5 400 in my Minolta X700 and I have the iso pushed right to 1600 would that have to get developed differently?

    Thanks guys!! Appreciate any feedback :smile:
     
  2. Ottrdaemmerung

    Ottrdaemmerung Member

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    Welcome to APUG! And welcome to film developing. You're going to love it, and there are lots of resources out there to help you get started. As for chemicals:
    Developer: This is the most crucial, and one picks a developer to suit the film and the look one wants to achieve. That said, Kodak D-76 is a great all-purpose developer. It comes as a powder and you mix it to make a stock solution, then dilute the stock as needed. Kodak HC-110 is also great, and it comes as a syrup that you can either mix into a stock solution (as instructed on the label), or better yet, there are tables online that tell you how to just mix a small amount of the syrup directly into a working solution.
    Stop bath: Any stop bath is good, and some use a color-changing indicator dye to signal when it's no longer effective. Popular brands include Kodak Indicator Stop and Ilford Ilfostop. I like the Ilford because it uses citric acid and so it has no odor.
    Fixer: Again, it doesn't really matter, but I like Ilford Rapid Fixer.

    Yes, you'll have to push your HP5 400 two stops in development. The developing time tables at http://www.digitaltruth.com should help you out. Good luck!
     
  3. MrRgoyer

    MrRgoyer Member

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    Thanks so much for the reply!!! Now it's to get all the stuff!! Is it a good idea to push film when your just starting out in developing?
     
  4. Ottrdaemmerung

    Ottrdaemmerung Member

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    Pushing film isn't normally done by folks who are brand new to developing, but it isn't difficult -- it merely involves extending the developing time past what you would normally use for box speed. Everything else remains the same.
     
  5. M.A.Longmore

    M.A.Longmore Subscriber

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    Welcome To APUG, And Welcome Back !

    I've been at it for a few years, and never had the need to try Push Processing.
    I thought about it a few times ... Just trying to keep things simple. Then again
    I've thought about Redscaling some film also, but then I came to my senses ...

    Ron
    .
     
  6. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Welcome to APUG! D-76 and HC110 are two good developers to start with. You can get by without stopbath just wash inbetween. Of course use a fixer. At the end use photo flow.

    Jeff
     
  7. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Don't forget the wetting agent for your final rinse; a few drops in the final rinse water will do just fine. It helps the film to dry without water spots.

    Good luck and happy developing.
     
  8. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Welcome to APUG!