Pan F+ exposure degradation

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Athiril, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    Hi all,

    Going on a trip overseas for a bit, I want to shoot some Pan F+ (120), how long until exposure degradation is noticeable?

    It'd be like about 2 weeks from exposure until it gets developed.
     
  2. ckpj99

    ckpj99 Member

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    If your film is fresh, I don't think it will be an issue. I love traveling with Pan F+ because I'm never worried putting it through the x-ray machines. I've waited more than two weeks before developing and see no difference.

    It's worth noting that I've found Pan F+ is very sensitive to agitation at least in the developer I use (HC-110). If you're worried about a loss in contrast, I would think an extra 15 seconds of agitation would make things pop.
     
  3. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    2 weeks is totally fine in my experience, having shot a bunch in Cambodia and then souped it about 3 weeks later on my return with no issues. It's when you leave it for many months that it starts to lose image.
     
  4. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    Pan F and X ray devices is not a problem. It only can become a problem with high ISO film and then with repeated exposure. As for degrading after exposure I have not even heard of this in UK. I can only suggest that it is when it is kept in high temperatures for an extended period that this happens, as it will with all films.
     
  5. gsgary

    gsgary Member

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    Garry winnogrand used to leave his for 2 years or more but that was 35mm, ive left HP5 120 for 2 months

    Sent from my GT-I9100P using Tapatalk 2
     
  6. Chamaeleo

    Chamaeleo Member

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    I have never heard of this problem either in UK. In the past I have developed Pan F and other Ilford films several years after exposure, even ones kept in a camera in the tropics, without any apparent effect. Where is the original evidence on this perceived need to keep the time between exposure and development as short as possible? I would like to know because I might learn something new.
     
  7. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    From another recent thread about PanF (emphasis mine):

    I've seen this as well with PanF, and have lost shots to films left undeveloped for a long time. I once ran a test and shot half a roll, stored it for four months then shot the remainder. The first half was noticeably thinner upon development. A month is not the end of the world, I myself wouldn't go longer than that without adding development time.
     
  8. JPD

    JPD Member

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    I have a roll of Pan F+ in a Rolleicord since 2010. I took two pictures back then, and the roll has been sitting in the camera since then. I will take some test shots and then develop the film maybe this winter. Perhaps I should add 30% time in the developer?
     
  9. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    it's called 'latent image stability' and it's not endless. film manufacturers have recommended to keep the time between exposure as short as possible,but stories of decade old mystry developments keep popping up too. one day we mayyet see a picture of a real neanderthal shot with an AGFA-click fromm 10,00 BC, WHO KNOWSI develop film as soon as i can ,but don't race home for it either.