Paper coating question

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by buggy, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. buggy

    buggy Member

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    I have seen many good prints and I especially like it when the image has somewhat of a border around the image with some brush marks. I was wondering how you guys mark the paper to coat. Do you put a pencil mark at each corner of the negative? Do you mask off an area and coat everything inside the mask? Do you pencil mark the edges of the paper?

    Any good suggestions?

    Thanks.
     
  2. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    Yeah using a normal #2 pencil. I use a sheet of the paper that goes between each piece of sheet film in the film boxes. Its a good easy way to mark up the area to be coated. just four small marks in the corners suffices just fine usually.

    hope that helps
     
  3. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    What he said. Just enough of a mark to be able to re-position the negative when the coating is dry, and to see where to coat when applying the emulsion. With most processes, the finished exposed print has dark enough borders that you can't see the pencil marks anymore.
     
  4. sanking

    sanking Member

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    I mask off the area to be coated with 3" wide paper painter's tape. The tape realeases easily from the paper after the coating is brushed on.

    I mask my negatives in such a way that a black border (or one the same color as the shadows of the print) about 0.2" wide is printed around the edges of the print.

    Sandy
     
  5. buggy

    buggy Member

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    Thanks everyone. I appreciate the responses.
     
  6. donbga

    donbga Member

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    I've used the method that Sandy describes too and it does work well. I will caution you not to press the tape adhesive down with a boning tool. I did this once and as a result when the tape was removed the paper came with it.
     
  7. sanking

    sanking Member

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    Don,

    I press the tape down quite firmly with my fingers and it always releases quite easily. What is a boning tool? Not familiar with that kind of instrument.

    Sandy
     
  8. donbga

    donbga Member

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    A boning tool is commonly used in book making and matt cutting. Simply put it is a slightly curved piece of plastic with a softly rounded point. With it you can make a crisp crease in paper or smooth surfaces with a stroking motion. It also allows you to place a lot of pressure on a small area during the stroke. When I did this I though I hadn't put too much pressure on the tape, but as it turned out it was just too much.

    There are several different shaped boning tools, I'll see if I can find a link to post that has an illustration of the tool.
     
  9. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Okay here is a link.

    http://www.artpaper.com/booksupply.html

    Scroll down towards the middle of the page. A picture of boning tools is shown on the right side of the page .
     
  10. sanking

    sanking Member

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    Thanks Don. Now I remember having seen these tools somewhere before.

    Sandy
     
  11. EricNeilsen

    EricNeilsen Member

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    For brush stroke edges, I use drafting tape or just pencil, but I don't mark anywhere near the printing area but rather the edges of the paper. I just use the tick marks on the edges to guide my eye to where I need to reach to with the brush. The drafting tape works well to define the coated area and keep the coated area about the same size each time.

    The approach will vary depending on how wide the brushed area is. I may have a piece of paper that is an inch or so bigger than the negative that is used as a template. I tape around it, coat the paper, peel off the tape and then go back and feather just the outside edges to give the free brush look, but get a well defined coated area to maintain speed and density of the print by keeping the coated area uniform from print to print.

    Using that same technique, you can give your print well define black borders by simply not brushing the extra coated area.

    The drafting tape comes in several widths for use with various sized prints. Using tape on some papers, like using the wrong brush, can lead to lift off of the paper. I also use it to hold down the corners of the paper during coating.

    Eric