Paper flasher I vs II

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Jarvman, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    Quick question. What exactly is the difference between the RH Designs paper flasher versions I and II? Is it simply the waterproof membrane? Do they function in exactly the same fashion otherwise? Cheers
     
  2. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Check with them directly, at darkroom [at) rhdesigns.co.uk - Richard will answer your questions, I am sure. Nice chap. :smile:
     
  3. frotog

    frotog Member

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    Waterproof membrane? Are you serious? Save your money, buy a sheet of lee diffusion gel #216 for $7, flash your paper directly under the enlarger with neg. in carrier.
     
  4. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I recall contacting Richard at RH Designs about exactly the same thing several months ago. As Jerevan has said he was very helpful. I think I recall that the mark I had a very tight battery compartment compared to the mark II making battery replacement a litle more difficult. You just need to be more careful. I don't recall anything about a waterproof membrane or Richard mentioning this but that isn't to say there isn't a waterproof membrane.

    The flasher is in my opinion just a little more convenient that the diffusion gel method mentioned. In fact that's a British understatement:D. It is a good deal more convenient and worthwhile if flashing is a regular part of your process but you may have concluded that yourself

    pentaxuser
     
  5. doughowk

    doughowk Subscriber

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    Got Flasher II and don't see any evidence of being waterproof (and don't want to test ;-) Its a great tool for when working with enlarging paper. But to low for contact paper such as Lodima.
     
  6. frotog

    frotog Member

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    Is using blue-tack or velcro to adhere this over-priced, poorly thought-out gizmo to the ceiling or the lensboard of your enlarger really easier than holding a piece of diffusion over your lens for a few seconds? Yeah, I think I'll hang it from the ceiling so I can see my shadow on the paper I'm intending on flashing:blink: Wow, look how easy! And is that supposed ease of use really worth 77 pounds? What's next - a talking thermometer? Looks like more shiny bait for well-heeled darkroom amateurs. Do you remember the sorely missed Dauxlite II? I wonder how many suckers bought that magic tool? Save your cash.
     
  7. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I apologise for extending the thread to cover my opinion on value for money which is now in danger of becoming the "main event".

    I should have confined my answer to what the OP wanted to know which had nothing to do with my or any other APUGer's views on value for money

    pentaxuser
     
  8. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member

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    Well, there is more to the flasher than that. The consistent output coupled with timing ability makes it worthwhile. I can't see how diffusion over the lens for a few seconds is equal to evenly distributed consistent light with precise timing?
     
  9. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member

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    I've found a piece of diffusion gel material filter made up of, well... a sheet of paper, a styrofoam coffee cup, or whatever to be far harder to control than the RH flasher kit I broke down and bought several years ago. I can't speak to the OP about I or II, but apparently, neither can you, and it would be far more helpful to confine your comments to the question at hand, and offer more constructive advice.
     
  10. doughowk

    doughowk Subscriber

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    As far as where to mount the Flasher, ideally it would be on something like a filter holder that would swing over the lens when flashing. On my Durst L1000, I'm missing that part; so have attached it to one side of the lens board via velcro.
     
  11. Michael R 1974

    Michael R 1974 Subscriber

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    I agree it seems the best way to mount it would be on something that could swing under the lens so that it is centered. But I also agree this thing is largely a waste of money and I never ended up using mine on any fine prints. Although the light passes through a diffuser, the overall light source is still too small an area in my opinion, and therefore does not result in uniform illumination over the easel. And while the timer is nice, I did not find the illumination level to be precisely constant.

    In the end I bought a small clunker Durst 35mm enlarger with a crap lens for $10, cranked the head up to max, defocused, stopped the lens down, and I flash with that enlarger. For anyone who has enough space for a small 35mm enlarger, this is really the best way to flash. You get even, uniform illumination every time, and you can even use different contrast filters if necessary, add neutral density to create long flash times for localized flashing etc. The RH paper flasher is a cute little device, but if you really look at what it is, it should be $10.
     
  12. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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    The rh flasher is excellent. Depending on your enlarger and lens you can mount it to the lens board without it getting the way. I put mine on a second enlarger that I don't use as much and calibrate the flasher at a standard height. The test strip function is nice though. I certainly don't think it is overpriced assuming that time is valuable. I have no idea why "waterproof" is useful for a flasher.

    The main things I like are reasonable flashing times, repeatability, test strip function, small size.
     
  13. RH Designs

    RH Designs Advertiser

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    To answer the OP's question, the two versions differ only in the construction of the timer; operation and performance are identical in both versions. We changed the design because the plastic cases we used for the Mk.1 were discontinued by the manufacturer. The Mk.2 is not waterproof, but the smooth fascia is wipe-clean.

    Those who criticise the price might like to attempt to run a small electronics manufacturing business in these over-taxed over-regulated times. If I could sell stuff cheaper I would. Fortunately I don't have any kids to support else I would have thrown in the towel long ago.
     
  14. cluttered

    cluttered Member

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    I'm another happy owner of a RH flasher. As with jeroldharter above, I find the accurate timing and repeatability very useful. Sure you can do flashing with just a foam cup but the RH product makes it an easy and repeatable process.

    I agree that it is not cheap, but I understand the economies of producing a specialised product, and to me it provides good value.
     
  15. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I believe Les McLean uses this flasher as well as the rest of the range of RH Designs products. He always struck me as a person who appreciates value for money and isn't given to buying high priced but poor value products.

    However each potential user has to do his/her own value analysis, of course.

    pentaxuser
     
  16. Brook Hill

    Brook Hill Subscriber

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    One big advantage with using the RH flasher instead of a separate enlarger is that is easy to flash only a part of the print instead of the whole paper. I tape a sheet of clear acetate to the easel, mark out the area to be flashed, hinge it out of the way whilst exposing from the neg then flap the acetate back over the paper and mask out the area not required to be flashed in the usual way. With the flasher there is no image to see except where you have outlined on the clear acetate. I reckon it's a great tool, wouldn't be without it, worth a box of paper.

    Tony
     
  17. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    That's a nice tip Tony! Cheers for that one
     
  18. frotog

    frotog Member

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    ...shame that it's not waterproof. Does it go "beep" when you've successfully fogged your paper?