Past Dated Fuji FP100c45

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Chuck Mintz, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. Chuck Mintz

    Chuck Mintz Member

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    I have a project where I want to use FP100c45 by reclaiming the negative. I have done some experimenting and have it more or less working. My local dealer has a pile of this stuff that is past the expiration date. My experience with past dated Polaroid films was pretty bad - they quickly had substantial color shifts and were prone to leave big patches unprocessed. Is the Fuji film more forgiving. Minor color shifts would not be a problem as the negative is being scanned.
     
  2. thicktheo

    thicktheo Subscriber

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    I've been using expired (2008) Fuji FP100c in both sizes, and I've never seen a problem like the ones you mention.
     
  3. amuderick

    amuderick Member

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    The Fuji material keeps much better than Polaroid. I've used expired Fp100-C without a problem. Also, I have 9 year old Fuji Instax film that shows no color shift, orange cast, or fading at all. It is really great, stable stuff.
     
  4. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Can you share what you are using to clean the backing off?
     
  5. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    The fuji stuff has a much longer shelf life than the polaroid ever had. But, if in doubt, why not just buy one box of expired stuff and try it out.

    Bruce, to remove the backing, all you do is toss the print in gently boiling water. After a few mins the emulsion floats right off. It is very robust and separates easily.
     
  6. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Keith.
    I don't think the OP is talking about emulsion lifts but I could be wrong.

    I was referring to the practice where you can clean off the black backing on the NEGATIVE side and then scan the neg.

    I've seen a bit about this lately on the web and was interested in his formula/substance they were using to clean the black stuff without damaging the negative portion.
     
  7. Barry S

    Barry S Member

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    I have some FP100C45 on the way and plan to experiment with recovering the negs. The techniques I'm familiar with generally use bleach--sometimes a gel bleach cleaner--to remove the backing.
     
  8. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Yes, the OP is talking about removing the black gunk from the negative side, not lifting the emulsion. I have not done it myself, but several students used gel bleach for this (and also did emulsion lifts - kind of weird with the Fuji) in the experimental photo class for which I T.A. It works, though I cannot say I have seen a "standard" optical print from the negs, as these students were not aiming for them. There is at least one good online article about it that the students used as a source.

    If you are after "standard" results, keep in mind that shooting "actual" color sheet film and having it processed is not much more expensive (about $5 - $6 per sheet total cost, or less if you use Samy's Santa Barbara).
     
  9. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    When you guys say "gel bleach" s this the laundry type stuff in a stick with chlorine bleach or whatever is in that stuff?

    Can anyone be more specific?

    Thanks.
     
  10. Barry S

    Barry S Member

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    I think the Chlorox splashless bleach would work. The idea is to contain the bleach on the backing side, so it doesn't spill onto (and dissolve) the emulsion. I also saw a technique where a cloth is soaked in bleach and placed against the backing layer for 15-20 minutes.
     
  11. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Oh okay, I've learned something new. Thanks.

    But if you are merely going to scan, why bother removing the backing?

    I have scanned the positive piece and it's very nice... albeit crinkled. I didn't put any time into fixing that issue, I kinda liked the whimsy of it.

    Anyway, good to know people are finding ever more enterprising ways to make use of this amazing film.
     
  12. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Keith,
    There is alot more info on the neg as Fujiroids can be contrasty.

    It seems to be popular with niche wedding shooters where once they have a figital file of the negative they can go alot of different directions regarding the post processing treatment.
     
  13. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Ok I'll give it a try myself.