Paterson adjustable reels

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by johnnywalker, Sep 23, 2009.

  1. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I can't figure out how to adjust the size they come in (35mm) to 120. There must be a trick to it, but I can't figure it out. Surely they're not just pulled apart! In any case I've been reluctant to try that for fear of breaking them. There's no directions on the package.
    It's probably something very simple that I'll kick myself for not figuring it out on my own.
    Anyone who's used them got any hints?
     
  2. ozphoto

    ozphoto Subscriber

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    Yes they do just pull apart sort of. You have to move one side clockwise and the other anti-clockwise to make them come apart. Once in two pieces, you choose the outer L shape to make a 120 sized spool, and then do the reverse to click them in place. :smile:
     
  3. Ian Tindale

    Ian Tindale Member

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    It's a bayonet action.
     
  4. RH Designs

    RH Designs Advertiser Advertiser

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    Hold one side and twist the other anticlockwise (depends which way you're looking at it I suppose - anyway the opposite direction to that which pulls the film onto the spiral) to release. Slide the two halves apart to the desired setting then reverse the twist to lock. There are more than 2 settings IIRC, 120 is the widest one and 35mm the narrowest.
     
  5. tony lockerbie

    tony lockerbie Subscriber

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    Don't be too gentle with them, takes a bit of force, but follow the advice above and you will be right. Oh, the middle setting is for 127, handy that!
     
  6. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    Thanks, it does take a bit more force than I was doing, but it works. That's a very tough plastic. Next will come the task of putting film on them. I hope it will be as easy as the 35mm is.
    Thanks again!
     
  7. shotgun1a

    shotgun1a Member

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    My experience with Pattersons is that I need to actuate the reel more slowly with 120 film than 135 and keep an "eye" (so to speak) on the leading edge of the film as it comes around that first time so it doesn't try to re-load itself. The paper isn't as easy to pull off as it seems with clip-type metal reels, but it's nothing insurmountable.
     
  8. photomem

    photomem Member

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    Maybe it is because I am using Ilford film, but the backing paper when I load 120 is a breeze. When I am pulling the film off the takeup spool, the paper just separates and all I have to do is trim off the end where the tape is holding it on. On the other hand, I have the same problem with the Patterson reel with it trying to reload itself. However, that is not enough to make me switch to a Hewes reel, which is the only other one our local camera shop carries.
     
  9. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    I like these better than the Paterson reels especially for 120/220. The wide flanges make getting the film started a breeze, and less likely to want to "reload" itself on the first go around. Try to find a couple. They're a little more expensive than the others - the difference in price is about the same as the cost of 1 roll of film. First time you don't mess up, it's paid for itself.
     
  10. ozphoto

    ozphoto Subscriber

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    When I load 120 on the Patterson reels,, I like to feed the end that was taped first. I don't remove it, just tear it at the film end. This gives me a little more stability on the end and I find it much easier to load.
     
  11. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    One of the keys with plastic reels is to ensure they are scrupulously clean, and also dry. And, yes, loading the taped part first can be a big help. My darkroom bud could load three Paterson reels with 120 whilst I was still cursing over the tab in the core of a 120 ss reel.
     
  12. ozphoto

    ozphoto Subscriber

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    So true, John.
    I was lucky enough to pick up umpteen reels rather cheaply (along with several tanks) which allows me to process up to 10 rolls of 35mm in one hit!
    Also means that I have a lot more work to do when they need to be cleaned every 6 months.... :wink:
     
  13. johnnywalker

    johnnywalker Subscriber

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    I shot a roll today and loaded it on the reel. Probably beginner's luck, but it went surprisingly smoothly. The contacts are drying as I write. I make contacts of every roll or sheet I shoot, but with 10 shots on a roll it's going to be a bit of a PITA to continue doing that, since I can only fit 9 shots on an 8 by 10 paper. The negatives turned out pretty good though, so it's a minor PITA. I'm going to love this camera.
     
  14. Xmas

    Xmas Member

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    If you leave the reels in washing soda or caustic sode or bleach over night occassionally they will be pretty clean.

    If you fold over (after tearing off from the backing paper) the pressure sensitive sticky tape at the beginning of the film back on to the film it will make it a little stiffer for loading.

    It is difficult in a changing bag you need a nice cool dark room for 120, that makes it easier.

    Noel
     
  15. Bill Jamieson

    Bill Jamieson Member

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    Can't say I've ever had any real problems with loading 120 film in Paterson reels as long as they're bone dry. The slightly tricky bit is getting the film started where I find that the best way is to grip the free end of the film between the forefinger and thumb and pull it through until it's past the little ball bearings. Thereafter the thumbs can be used alternately to feed it through while gripping both sides of the reel (easier to do than describe).

    Bill