Paterson Test Strip Maker

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Micky, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. Micky

    Micky Member

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    Can anyone tell me if the Paterson Test Strip Printer has a base on which the paper sits onto? If not, then all is good. If so, then I have a couple of further questions.

    Do you need to remove the easel to use the device, or does it just sit straight onto the surface on which you lay your paper (easel base)?

    Does it give slightly different exposure results to the full size print, or is the small amount of distance of the paper to lens negligible?

    Sorry for the silly questions, but I've always just used a piece of board to make strips, but I'd like to speed the process, whilst still giving accurate results.
     
  2. RH Designs

    RH Designs Advertiser Advertiser

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    It has a base which is about 1/4 inch thick. This is enough to throw focus off a bit if you lay it on the easel but doesn't appreciably affect exposure, unless you're making very small prints. It's a handy device but more often than not I just lay a piece of paper on the easel and use a piece of card.
     
  3. Micky

    Micky Member

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    Hi Richard, thanks for the info, just what I needed to know.

    BTW, nice to chat to you last night on the phone, and I look forward to receiving my Stopclock Pro next week!

    Regards
    Ty
     
  4. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I have found that the Paterson's height is very close to my easel's height so no problem but if not then focus neg onto the Paterson, do the strips then refocus on your easel. Certainly the slight difference in enlarger column height isn't going to affect exposure by enough to be detectable IMO

    pentaxuser
     
  5. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    I have found Ralph Lambrecht's idea of making a masking jig to slide the test paper under the same area of the projected image very useful.

    It allow different time exposures of the same are of the image to be reviewed. I find it is a very useful improvement, when used with his f/stop printing times approach.

    I find that (after many years of learning) I can visually 'eyeball' the white light aperture settign to be somehwere in the 8-16 second range most of the time. I add in the MG filter that I think is my best first guess for the contrast to be used.

    I then print 7 1x5" strips onto a piece of 5x7 paper, for times of 8, 10.1, 12.7, 16, 20.2, 25.4 and 32 seconds.

    This test strip shows me the nuances of tone that differnt times give. It als guides me if I have picked the right contrast filter as a first guess, and acts as a first step to a guide of where dodges and burns are likely needed.
     
  6. RH Designs

    RH Designs Advertiser Advertiser

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    Hi Ty - I didn't realise it was you asking the question! Anyway, your StopClock's on its way :smile:.
     
  7. nolindan

    nolindan Member

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    If you can find it, Durst made a very nice printer where the paper slid under an aperture.
     
  8. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    There is no reason to worry about a focusing issue. First of all, it's a test strip, and secondly, the depth of field will normally cover the focus error. For example, for an 8x10 enlargement from a 35mm negative, the depth of field at the baseboard is 28 mm at f/8!
     
  9. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    I'm glad you like it, Mike. Quite a few people have built one, and I've seen them in all kinds of materials such as cardboard, plastic, wood and stainless steel! It's still available here:

    http://www.waybeyondmonochrome.com/WBM2/TOC_files/TestStripPrinterEd2.pdf
     
  10. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Ralph:

    Re your "typical" images (see caption under first photograph in the linked to article).

    Somehow they don't look like my "typical" images :smile:.
     
  11. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    As long as we all celebrate God's beautiful creations in our own typical way.
     
  12. jerry lebens

    jerry lebens Member

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    Over the years, I've picked up several Paterson 'Test Strip Makers' but the only use I've ever found for one is to stick it under the darkroom door when I needed some air...

    Am the only person here to find it the most gratuitously redundant piece of darkroom equipment ever invented? It's fiddly and it's not big enough to make a proper test strip. At least those incredibly expensive dodging kits actually work and you can even eat a chocolate teapot.

    What's wrong with a good old bit of card?

    Regards
    Jerry
     
  13. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    Only one thing: it can't make a test strip with different exposures of the same image area. I do however agree somewhat with you opinion about the equipment mentioned. That's why developed a different piece of kit, which can do both kinds of test strips. It beats a simple card hands-down, except as a door stop. The card is more flexible to do that job.
     
  14. anon12345

    anon12345 Member

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    Jerry,

    How would you like another one? You can have mine. ;-)


    I like the idea of being able test the same area of the print for each exposure. The only way I can see this working is for the test strip to move in steps. Hey, I can do this.
     
  15. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I have a Saunders Colour Proofing Easel that does four identically cropped 4x5 test prints on the same 8x10 sheet - simple, elegant and no moving parts.

    Admittedly it is a bit large, and sometimes a 4"x5" "strip" is awkward for tests, but I find it works really well.

    I even have the instructions :smile:.
     
  16. youngrichard

    youngrichard Member

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    I made a test printer to Ralph Lambrecht's design and even uploaded photos to another similar thread on this site last year (but can't work out how to link to it).
    Apart from the other pluses noted above, it seemed to me that all the commercial devices gave 6 strips, which means you get 2 or three darker and 2 or 3 lighter strips, whereas I want 3 darker and 3 lighter. I don't want to struggle to remember which was my starting exposure - was it the third or the fourth? And finally my RH Designs Analyser gives me 7 strips automatically, 3 darker and three lighter than baseline. Making a custom test strip printer is a perfect project for a rainy weekend.
    Richard