Pentax Auto 110 and Orca Cartridges

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by Lobalobo, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. Lobalobo

    Lobalobo Member

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    Lomography just started producing 110 film cartridges, which it calls Orca. The film is 100 ASA B&W. This intrigued me so I bought on eBay a Pentax Auto 110 and three lenses. My question is about how the camera (which offers no manual adjustments) will set ASA. I found this on a miniature-camera site:

    "Accurate ASA Film settings are a bit of a problem with Pentax 110's (and many other 110's). Both the Auto 110 and the Super had the necessary activating pin to be set for either ASA 80 film or ASA 400. The problem is that today, the only emulsions still available are colour negative 200 and 400, and most film cartridges seem to be indexed for the lower speed film. If you are shooting with 400 film and the camera thinks its 80, you get an automatic 2 1/3 stop overexposure on a very small negative."

    Well for the Orca film, the lower ASA setting is what is needed (80 is close enough to 100 and if I ever find a developing reel that will take 110 film I can adjust negative density with developing time). I wonder, though, whether the Orca cartridge will in fact trigger the camera's lower ASA setting. Anyone know? Here's hoping.
     
  2. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    See the photos I submitted 6/18 in my gallery. I used a Minolta Weathermatic A for some photos and then transfered the film to an Agfamatic 2000. The Minolta triggers off the cartridge and seemed to work well.
    I use Microphen developer, which is not listed in Lomgraphys information, so I reduced the time from ID-11 which is listed. I developed for 6.5 min., and have decided that's a little too much. The negatives are a bit dense and contrasty. I will probably try 5.5 to 6.0 min. next time.
    The film seems pretty nice - fine grain and good gradiation. I didn't get much fogging at the end as the film was quite long and protected itself pretty well. I do hope they put paper backing on the next batch as logging your exposures is a pain.
    I had a couple of SS 16mm reels, and so was ready to process.
    I'm having fun using 110 again. I do use Minox some too. I'm glad to see the return of 110 film, as all the available color is out of date, although I have good luck with what I have gotten from The Frugal Photographer. I hope Adox will get their 100 out soon, although with the situation in Europe, they may still be a while. If Germany has to bail out the rest of the EU ...
     
  3. Lobalobo

    Lobalobo Member

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    This is all nice, thanks, but does not comment on my question, which is whether the cartridge will push in the pin for slower shutter speeds.
     
  4. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

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    It should, since all of the 110 machines that were left were keyed to the lower speed. To tell conclusively, look on the right side of the cartridge (label facing towards you). Low speed film has a tab running 4/5 of the way down the side, whereas high speed film has a tab running only halfway down the side.
     
  5. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    Thought I answered that. nikrapak has it right - the Lomography Orca cartridges have the right tab to set the camera to ISO 100.
     
  6. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Now if you want to push the film or if you have 400 film, just take a pair of needlenose pliers and break off a small (1/16 inch square) piece of the cartridge where it fits under the lower right corner of the film gate (looking at the back of the camera).

    This won't fool the Pocket Instamatic 20. It seems that tab was originally designed to indicate film is loaded - and it engages the "wind until you get to the perforation" mode.

    Does the Orca film have perforations to stop the winding? Or do you have to stop by watching the numbers on the back? Or does it even have numbers on the back?
     
  7. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    The Orca film has perforations at each frame. There are no numbers as there is no backing. The window in the cartridge is covered by the label.
     
  8. Lobalobo

    Lobalobo Member

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    No numbers on the back (no paper) and so the cartridge has black tape where the numbers would be. Although I'm waiting for a replacement, the current Auto 110 I have only winds with the battery-operated winder and it stops for each exposure until there are no more exposures (which I assume means that the film no longer has perforations at the end, though it's not clear to me how, mechanically this is communicated to the winder).
     
  9. Lobalobo

    Lobalobo Member

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    Thanks to all for the helpful responses.
     
  10. Lobalobo

    Lobalobo Member

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    Perfect; just what I need, and thanks. How, by the way, mechanically, does the battery-operated winder know that the exposures are exhausted. It does some how because the winder runs until manually shut down once the there film is used up, but stops appropriately until then. Must have something to do with the perforations, but I can't quite figure out the mechanics of it. (I'd test with a manual advance but the camera I have doesn't work on manual advance). Thanks again.