Pentax Digital spotmeter

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by mono, Jun 17, 2006.

  1. mono

    mono Subscriber

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    Is there a lens hood available for this spotmeter?
    If not and building my own tube to shade the lens how long must it be?
    Thank you very much for your input!
     
  2. david b

    david b Member

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    I am not sure if there is one specific to the meter, but it is a 40.5 filter ring.
     
  3. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    I ind it easier to cup my hand around it when necessary. Less to pack to; always take my hands with me anyway.
     
  4. mono

    mono Subscriber

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    Thank you Ralph!
    I really forgot the hands, but do you blacken them? ;-))
     
  5. David H. Bebbington

    David H. Bebbington Inactive

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    I just checked mine and the viewing angle seems to be equivalent to about an 85 mm lens on 35 mm, so any 40.5 mm lens hood designed for a standard lens would be fine - even a longer hood which vignetted the viewing screen would not of course affect the 1° exposure metering. As the lens is quite well recessed in its mount, a hood is not really necessary.

    Regards,

    David
     
  6. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    There are times when I just have to get very close to an object for the reading. Case in point is the recent upload I made with the Snake Bridge images. The shadows are in a field of light, which is the glaring noon day sun here in Tucson (summer shot). Reflections from the surrounding light areas can affect readings quite a bit in the narrow shadow areas. I had to get right on top of the shadows in order to meter properly, as there was so much light bouncing around inside that it was difficult to get a realistic value any other way. For me, this is a "worst case" scenario to meter. Most other scenes don't have this amount of light flooding the shadows, with narrow edges to worry about. tim
     
  7. Loose Gravel

    Loose Gravel Member

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    I've seen some use a metal tube that slips over the lens. Worked well with the analog meter. I think now with the digi model, you need to use your hand. Don't forget to use your hand on the camera, too, when you take the picture. This comes down to the lens flare of the meter vs the camera.

    When making any lens shade don't forget as the angle gets shallower, the material becomes more reflective. Doesn't matter how black it is. A few sharp baffles are better than a longer lens shade.
     
  8. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    I use a 40.5mm to series VI adapter on which is screwed a stack of five Series VI retainer rings. Cheap, easy, works well and if dropped - protects the front of the meter.