Photo industry lubricants

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by waynecrider, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Location:
    Floriduh
    Shooter:
    35mm
    In the industry, what is used for metal on metal wear points?
     
  2. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,224
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wayne,

    Can you be a little more application specific please?

    Richard
     
  3. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

    Messages:
    4,913
    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Aqu
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Some run dry; some use clock oil. An old quick-and-dirty trick for cleaning and lubricating leaf shutters is allegedly to dissolve 5-10% clock oil in ether; slosh the shutter around in that for a while; drain it; and let it dry. A tiny amount of oil is left: not enough to gum up the blades, but enough to add a little lubricant on the bearings. I'd be grateful if anyone who has actually tried this could say if it works.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,926
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Coating machines and other lab equipment must be kept clear of oil as any oil contamination will cause coating defects. But, I have no idea what they use or how they use it.

    I do know that many moving parts have air bearings.

    PE
     
  5. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    18,005
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I think the current quick-and-dirty method of cleaning a leaf shutter is to flush it with lighter fluid (the "Ronsonol Flush"). It can work with all metal shutters like Compur and Ilex/Acme shutters, but it's bad for older Graflex shutters that have rubber blades, and an absolute disaster for old Compound shutters with paper blades.

    What I do for Compur and Ilex shutters is to open them up and remove the speed-setting dial, flush in a container of naphtha (which is the main ingredient in lighter fluid), and use a drop of light oil like sewing machine oil in the slow speed retard mechanism (run the shutter on 1 sec and it's the assembly with the spinning gears), and this will usually keep the shutter running well for a few years. I use a light coating of lithium grease in the channels for the speed setting dial to keep the dial running smoothly and reduce wear in the dial.

    The usual lubricant for shutter and aperture blades is graphite powder.

    In answer to the original question, I haven't checked lately, but as I recall, there is a range of lubricants for different purposes available at www.micro-tools.com.
     
  6. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,740
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Some people do this, but I have never seen this recommended in any shutter service manual I have read. I believe the usual "lubricant" for shutter/aperture blades is SCRUPULOUS CLEANLINESS. :smile:
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    18,005
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Well, I've gotten shutters back from SK Grimes while Mr. Grimes was alive with graphite powder on the blades.
     
  8. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,740
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have no doubt that you speak the truth. As I said: "Some people do this..."
     
  9. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Location:
    Floriduh
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I've got a lens adapter with some moving parts. I think a little lubricant wouldn't hurt on the metal contact points.
     
  10. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,926
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It is interesting to see how a simple statement can mean different things to different people.

    PE
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

    Messages:
    4,913
    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Aqu
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Clock oil.
     
  12. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,224
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I agree with Roger. Clock oil has less tendency to spread than most oils. One lubricant I use as well is "Lock ease" made by AGS. It is graphite suspended in a solvent. It is good for locks as well.

    Richard
     
  13. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

    Messages:
    4,913
    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Aqu
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    And less tendency to dry up/gum up with time.
     
  14. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,224
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    "And less tendency to dry up/gum up with time.":D :D :D
     
  15. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

    Messages:
    4,913
    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Aqu
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Aaaargh. Didn't notice it when I wrote it, obviously.
     
  16. bob100684

    bob100684 Member

    Messages:
    509
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm
    we use white grease on the drive chains of our fuji film and print proscesors. Not sure if it's anything special, all the writing other than fuji film is in japanese.
     
  17. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,224
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Another method which may be suitable for some applications is to apply a very small amount of paste wax with a Qtip.
     
  18. Kino

    Kino Member

    Messages:
    1,730
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2006
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Just as an aside, if you have sticky processing gear, a tiny bit of anhydrous lanolin can work as a lubricant. A cine film processor manufacturer I know uses it on the PVC valves in their chemical recirculation loops and it does not spot the film. Of course, it may make a difference that their developer tank is 500 gallons and recirculated by 3 horsepower pumps!
     
  19. Mark Layne

    Mark Layne Member

    Messages:
    919
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2003
    Location:
    Nova Scotia
    A very similar result can be obtained using 'Quickstart' from the auto supply store such as Canadian Tire. It is essentially ether and seems to leave just enough residue to lubricate.
    Mark