Photo sensitive glasses and Photography

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by LyleB, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. LyleB

    LyleB Member

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    You would think that they would be compatible with the name similarities.:D

    I spent the day yesterday, bright, sunny, not too cold, outside, along the Lake Huron Shoreline testing out my several new (used) film bodies. The day was so bright, that my glasses became VERY dark. Too dark to see well enough to focus and even had a difficult time seeing the lighted LED's in the viewfinder of my FM2.

    Guess I'll have to get some normal glasses too. Never had this problem as noticeably as yesterday, but this is the first time I went out in the bright with these particular glasses. Never even thought of that as an important factor.

    Live and learn.
     
  2. werra

    werra Subscriber

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    Yet another issue with photo sensitive glasses, not serious tho, is the color. Mine are a bit yellowish even indoors.
     
  3. Ray Rogers

    Ray Rogers Member

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    Try contacting a negative onto the lens... and let us see the result!

    :smile:
     
  4. Chazzy

    Chazzy Member

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    You might be able to add a diopter to the viewfinder of at least some of your cameras, rather than buying a new pair of glasses. Then you would just take your glasses off. Glasses certainly are expensive.
     
  5. rjbuzzclick

    rjbuzzclick Member

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    I would think that they would also be problematic if you shoot Sunny-16.
     
  6. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    I once had some of these photo chromatic glasses and I had to get an additional pair with ordinary lenses because they reduced the apparent screen brightness of my cameras by about two stops,. and if that wasn't bad enough, to add insult to injury my wife said they made me look like a gangster.
     
  7. budrichard

    budrichard Member

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    Photochromic glasses such as Transitions or the new 'DriveWear' can get very dark if exposed to sunlight with a snow cover which is extremely reflective. I have sets of both script lenses as the DriveWear are too dark for night time. If I don't wear my photochromic glasses, it is all too easy to get snow blind in these conditions. I have learned to raise my glasses when composing and shooting, there is really not much else to do. Without snow cover, I shoot without glasses.-Dick
     
  8. cheuwi

    cheuwi Member

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    I echo the issues with these "transition" lenses... I heard that cold temperature can make them go darker and faster than warmer days.
     
  9. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    Another point that occurs to me is, in these days when the general public regards photographers with suspicion at the best, and as paedophiles at the worst, I don't think they are a very good idea.
     
  10. Pompiere

    Pompiere Member

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    The cold also keeps them from lightening when you go inside or when the sun goes down. Mine take about 10 minutes to warm up and return to normal after coming in from the snow.