Photograher's Formulary Rodinal Question.

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by coriana6jp, Sep 9, 2005.

  1. coriana6jp

    coriana6jp Member

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    Hi,

    I have been reading this forum for a while, and have been amazed at all the great information and help.

    I searched the archives, but could not find an answer to my situation. I live in rural area in Japan, where normal Agfa Rodinal is very hard to come by, most of the stores in Tokyo will not ship it. However I managed to get some Photographer's formulary Rodinal.

    I mixed it up according to the instructions, however the final result is not exactly what I expected. It is a rather think heavy thick yellow liquid. I am not sure if this is what its actually suppose to be l or not. I don't want to try to develop anything, before I proceed.

    Any information would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!!

    Gary
     
  2. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I can't say about the color of Formulary's Rodinal, but I have mixed a Rodinal substitute from "The Darkroom Cookbook". It's color is a light tan and a bit thicker than water. Perhaps the Formulary's version is supposed to be a yellowish color. All I can really say is to try a test roll of something unimportant, process it and see how it comes out.
     
  3. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    Contact The Formulary !

    .
     
  4. coriana6jp

    coriana6jp Member

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    Well, thanks to both of you gentleman for replying. I greatly appreciate the help.

    The liquid itself is a tan color, so at least so far it sounds right. However, I tried to develop one sheet of film in my tank and it was completely blank. My first attempt was no sucessful, but I will try again. For the time being I am afraid to try any more.

    I will drop an email to the Formulary and see what they have to say.

    Thanks Again!!

    Gary
     
  5. Will S

    Will S Member

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    I tried to mix some from their kit too and wound up with a white viscous substance. I just bought it online then. Are you sure you can't buy it pre-mixed? It seems hard to mix yourself. And dangerous.

    Thanks,

    Will
     
  6. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    From what I recall of a photo.net thread on this subject from a year or so ago, the nearly opaque liquid means you haven't passed the "precipitate forms" stage and need to continue adding sodium hydroxide solution until the precipitate clears (redissolves), leaving only a few crystals to maintain the solution in a saturated state.

    However, if you've added all the sodium hydroxide provided, you should certainly contact Formulary and let them know that either their kit or their directions leave something seriously to be desired...
     
  7. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    The preparation of a rodinal type developer is a bit tricky. Unlike other developers its preparation is not a matter of just dumping everything together.

    Formulas call for a solution of paraminophenol hydrochloride together with potassium metabisulfite. To this is added, with stirring, a concentrated solution of either sodium or potassium hydroxide. At first, a thick precipitate of the paraminophenol base will form. This precipitate will dissolve with the addition of more hydroxide solution. The trick is to add hydroxide solution until there is a sudden darkening of the solution. At this point the hydroxide solution should be added very slowly drop by drop with constant stirring until only a small amount of precipitate remains. Should all the precipitate dissolve the addition of a few crystals of potassium metabisulfite should restore some precipitate.

    Paraminophenol behaves as an acid in strongly alkaline solution and forms a salt called a phenolate. However, this salt is unstable in the presence of an excess of hydroxide. This is why a small amount of precipitate must remain to indicate that there is no excess. Unless the instructions are followed carefully the developer will not keep. There will probably be some leftover hydroxide solution which should be diluted with water and flushed down the sink with plenty of water.