photographing planet X on infra red film

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by paulie, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. paulie

    paulie Member

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    the ultimate challenge, anybody out there have any tips in this challenge?
     
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    What is planet X, and could you be more specific?
     
  3. paulie

    paulie Member

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    planet x is the tenth planet in our solar system ,it is thought to be a brown dwarf/binary star.

    it has very little light output and therefore needs a infra red range to record on film

    its in a retrograde orbit with our sun and should be viewable over the southern hemisphere
     
  4. Moopheus

    Moopheus Subscriber

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  5. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    That "is the tenth planet" is rather optimistic.

    A planet being a star, a star being a planet is something else...
    :wink:
     
  6. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    My understanding was that the Planet X theory was finally killed a while ago. So, photographing something that doesn't exist would be quite a feat!
     
  7. Moopheus

    Moopheus Subscriber

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    There isn't, as far as we can see, a "tenth planet"--just a lot of stuff out in the oort cloud and the Kuiper belt. There remains some speculation of a distant brown or red dwarf companion, but it's just that--highly speculative. There's certainly nothing that could be picked up by an amateur telescope and ordinary film.
     
  8. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    This month's Make Magazine has an article about building and launching your own orbiting satellite - perhaps this might help? Getting the film back could be troublesome though ...
     
  9. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    It seems to me you'll need a helluva lens to record it.

    Jeff
     
  10. David William White

    David William White Member

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    No, just get closer.
     
  11. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    Maybe one of these?

    [​IMG]
     
  12. paulie

    paulie Member

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    please state your evidence
     
  13. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    :laugh:
    The classic conspiracy theorists/new ageist response!
    Thanks!

    Say what: if you come back when you have captured Planet X on film, and can present convincing evidence that what you show us is indeed a solar system object that could be classified as a planet, i'll stop laughing.
    :laugh:
     
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  15. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    "Myles Standish had used data from Voyager 2's 1989 flyby of Neptune, which had revised the planet's total mass downward by 0.5%—an amount comparable to the mass of Mars[36]—to recalculate its gravitational effect on Uranus.[37] When Neptune's newly determined mass was used in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Developmental Ephemeris (JPL DE), the supposed discrepancies in the Uranian orbit, and with them the need for a Planet X, vanished.[3] Moreover, there are no discrepancies in the trajectories of any space probes such as Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 that can be attributed to the gravitational pull of a large undiscovered object in the outer Solar System.[38] Today, most astronomers agree that Planet X, as Lowell defined it, does not exist.[39]"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet_x
     
  16. paulie

    paulie Member

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    i am however talking about a possible binary star
     
  17. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Well you need to go to your closet and haul out your Applied Kinetics XBK 2000-B Time-Space Warper. If you don't have yours anymore you can find them online or at pawn shops pretty cheap. Get the newer model; the older one will blow out the fuses in your house. Set it to 1/13 power. If you're using a large format camera, you might need a little more power, I don't know for sure. Calculate the trajectory needed to beam your camera to a point near enough to get an image, being cautious not to disrupt or destroy anything orbiting Earth, like satellites or the Space Station, because they could disrupt the trajectory you calculated, as well as possibly cause a few legal troubles. You should have already acquired some IR film off ebay or wherever, and loaded it into a sufficiently late model camera. I use my grandpa's Argus C3. Put the camera in the camera mount, being careful to secure it, and attach the whole thing to the XBK 2000-B. If the mount is missing, use a bungee cord. Just be sure it's tight.
    Hit the button that says WARP, and after the planet appears to be in line of sight, hit the button marked GO and your camera will instantly be close enough to get the picture. Use the self timer, long cable releases are costly and hard to find. Hit the BACK button to retrieve the camera so you can wind the film and reset the self timer. If your camera advances film all by itself, that helps, but you still need to reset the self timer. An intervalometer comes in handy so you don't have to mess with that either, though I heard of a fellow who trained a rat to hit the shutter release and wind the film.

    I've never tried to get Planet X. I got some good shots of Mercury, but then I heard it's poisonous, so I don't do that anymore. I heard my grandpa somehow got pictures of a mercury comet, but I haven't found them yet. Just some pictures of an old car.

    Oh by the way, some shielding is helpful to avoid radiation fogging the film. I put the camera in one of those lead lined bags with just the lens sticking out. Even though you're warping space-time, a little bit of real time radiation always seems to get through. YMMV.

    Well that's all there is to it. HTH :smile:
     
  18. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    As a solar system object, yes...

    I put it to you, Paulie, that there are invisible little brown dwarfs living in your house that are responsible for all the bad things in this world when they play ringaringoroses in pairs. What would i need to take a picture of those?
    And don't tell me there are no such things in your house! Where's the evidence?!
    And i'm talking little stars, for goodness' sake!

    :laugh:
     
  19. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    I know for a fact I do - I call them our cats though. :wink:
     
  20. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    and..... SCENE!
     
  21. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    How were we? Do you want to do it again? I think we could do better, i mean, i didn't quite catch the right tone. Not quite, i mean... what do you say?
     
  22. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Sure-why not? :D
     
  23. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    :laugh::laugh::laugh:
     
  24. Moopheus

    Moopheus Subscriber

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    NASA is in fact currently engaged in an infrared sky-survey project to try to find such objects. Look here:

    http://wise.ssl.berkeley.edu/index.html

    though it will take them a while to sort the data.

    I'd still have to say, basically not possible with film, even if you knew where to look.
     
  25. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    This is also known as the "Nemesis Theory". It has been debunked in the following manner.

    Jupiter is 200X larger than the Earth and is not a brown dwarf but it does distort the solar system a tad due to its mass. A brown dwarf would have to be much more massive than Jupiter and would distort orbits to an even greater extent in spite of the distance. In view of the rather stable orbits of the minor planets found in the Oort cloud and the lack of distortions elsewhere, a brown dwarf is not very likely at all and one with an irregular orbit is impossible based on the stability of the Solar System.

    If a brown dwarf entered the Solar System proper, it would disrupt the orbits totally and we would not see the relative stability now seen and traceable back over millions of years.

    Now, this isn't to say that a brown dwarf is impossible in a way out orbit like Proxima Centauri is to Alpha Centauri, but it rules out the Nemesis Theory aspect and would place a brown dwarf at about .2 - 1 LY away in a stable orbit around the sun of 500,000 years or longer.

    PE
     
  26. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Well, thanks a lot guys. Now I'm never gonna be able to sell my XBK 2000-B. :sad: