Photojournalism in Syria

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by Cold, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. Cold

    Cold Member

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  2. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    I think that they are wrong. If you have the photos available you should run them. A media blaackout is one thing but to have them and not publish them is almost complicence with the regime. The people fo the world have the right to know what is happening there, to not publish photos like this is keeping information from the people. Also, the photograph took great risk in getting these photos. If I were him I would approach another publication.
     
  3. Diapositivo

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    A newspaper publishes news. War makes news.

    I have to interpret this as an affirmation, by the Sunday Times, that they publish only second- or third-hand material from other newspapers who "immorally" gather news from Syria, or that they just don't talk at all about the civil war in Syria.

    Maybe we can conclude, from this, that the Sunday Times simply is not a newspaper.

    When you buy a newspaper you do it because you expect to find information, not "moral decisions".

    "Embedded journalism" had the final result of making some confuse government press statements with "information".
     
  4. AgX

    AgX Member

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    The idea is that there would not be photographs as there is no more commercial incentive to make them.

    But what about photographs made without commercial interest and still offerred?
     
  5. Vilk

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    they do--in proportion to the effort they have expended on making the bloodshed stop

    i'm with paterson; sounds like a journalist i'd like to meet for a change
     
  6. StoneNYC

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    I get the litigious angle they are going at but it seems a pretty sad commentary on our world that news isn't news unless its safe for the journal/newspaper to print without repercussion.

    I was recently at a news desk at 30 Rock (Rockefeller Center NY MSNBC news desk) and one of the desks had a quote on it which I found interesting... Which I now can't find even though I personally wrote it down... Ugh... Well it basically said 'newspapers should be shocking, if its not shocking then it's just advertisement for someone' that is a terrible paraphrase of a really good quote but that's the simplest I could get it down to.

    Anyway I think that news has gone down the toilet, I haven't watched a news anchor on TV and not been embarrassed by how uneducated and in cultured they are, they are trying to appeal (relate) to the stupid people by hiring buffoons to report instead of acting like real journalists because speaking intelligently would probably confuse half the population and they would change the channel instead of challenging them to be more intelligent and worldly It's a pretty sad state of affairs... And now newspapers are failing just as badly... I'm afraid for the future... Does anyone know what happened with that 'propaganda bill'? Maybe that's why they won't take Syrian coverage.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Darkroom317

    Darkroom317 Member

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    I thoroughly agree with this. Broadcast has completely different standards both in intelligence and in ethics as opposed to print. They are celebrities who like to sit in the studio and pretend to know what they are talking about. Real journalists report from the field and interview people from all sorts of situations, not so called experts who work for that network.
     
  8. StoneNYC

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    +1


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  9. summicron1

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    i think the newspaper is making a morally correct decision -- they have their own staff, as they say, and their staff reporters and photographers are paid to go there.

    The problem is that there are too many would-be David Douglas Duncans out there hoping to become a great photojournalist, and wars have become something of a magnet for them. I remember in Sarajevo the residents came to hate the media who seemed to see their suffering and dying as some sort of show for the rest of the world. The photographers would stake out a spot where they knew snipers were shooting and wait for someone to get it.

    and the paper isn't saying don't go -- it's just saying if you do, we're not buying.
     
  10. StoneNYC

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    Would you say this about Steve McCurry?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. Brian C. Miller

    Brian C. Miller Member

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    Here's the real point of it: If the newspaper wants to bypass a good photo, then so be it! Somebody else gets the scoop, somebody else gets the attention. That's the reality of the marketplace. And it's just one paper, not a collective. The editors want to make that choice, fine. Read a different paper.

    A while back, one of the New York papers decided that they wouldn't cover a certain popular celebrity tragedy magnet for two weeks. Coincidentally, there wasn't any news about that celebrity for two weeks. There was a hubub when they announced what they had done, cries of censorship, etc. But the world press is pretty free, isn't it? If one paper doesn't cover something, another will.

    The quote might be, "If a newspaper isn't shocking, then it's entertainment for someone." The paper is supposed to full of news, not opinion. The Oregonian is nicknamed by many as, The Oregroanian, because of all the opinion in it. The small Yakima Herald is a paper that will lead the front page with a breaking science story, but you'll be lucky to find it in The Oregonian.

    I think that's the primary reason that many papers have folded. The readership went away because the papers all ran the same sipid story from the wire, and when the Internet came along, what was the point of buying the paper? Everybody ran the same story, even for local news. Newspapers have claimed to feel the presure from radio and television, but radio has been popular in the early 1900s, and TV has been popular since the 1940s. That pressure hasn't been anything new. Newspapers cut back on reporting, so people's eyeballs went someplace more interesting. People will pay for something interesting. But the newspapers really aren't interesting anymore, because they aren't being our interesting insight.
     
  12. StoneNYC

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    I agree with most of that, especially the last paragraph. And as far as the quote, it was certainly about advertising and not entertainment, but damn I can't even find it in google, wish I had taken a picture... but that's kind of a no-go on movie/TV sets.
     
  13. batwister

    batwister Member

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    If the pictures need to be seen, post them to a blog, bring on the hits. The mass media, competitively driven, will come crawling. Having said that, at the moment, social media will perhaps present him with equal political complications. Then copyright issues... SIGH! Forget it. Let's just watch the Kardashians.
     
  14. StoneNYC

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    Well as a photographer you should understand the COST involved in keeping up equipment and your own livelihood, as much as he may love getting the info out there he still needs to eat... the reason to go there is to sell the images...
     
  15. Brian C. Miller

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    I saw a post on PetaPixel about a Japanese fellow who is a war zone tourist. He just likes going into war zones and photographing them. No money, no fame, just for the thrill. I forget what his day job is. But yeah, he's definitely the exception to the rule.
     
  16. ColdEye

    ColdEye Member

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    He is a truck driver if I remember correctly. He goes to war zones every year. That's one heck of an adrenaline rush.
     
  17. StoneNYC

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    Exactly, he has another job...


    ~Stone

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  18. Cold

    Cold Member

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    Wow! I had forgotten that I'd made this post here (it's been a crazy few days), but I'm really glad to see the discussion.

    For those in the know: what do you think are the chances of this sort of...embargo for lack of a better word...catching on with other publishers, and possibly artificially reducing/eliminating the market for war-zone photojournalism?

    I tend to agree with others here that, at this point, it's their moral (not to mention economical) prerogative to choose what they will and will not buy, and that there are many more buyers out there. But if this were to catch on among publishers, could it progress to the extent that the media was, in effect, keeping people in the dark about the realities of war? I understand that there are now alternatives, such as blogs, that can be operated by any individual and reach the entire world, but these sources don't have nearly the audience of international major media sources.
     
  19. StoneNYC

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    I tend to err on the side of "the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one" in that the safety of the photographer is less important than getting news out about suffering people that images might help cause uproar that would lead to a safer life for some of those suffering.

    The photographer knows his choice and knows he is risking his life, that's his choice to make, the people in those regions didn't all choose to be there, And having info, images, story to go with it is critical to getting help to these people in whatever little might come of it.

    So that's my opinion anyway. Censorship for WHATEVER reason is bad IMHO.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  20. Diapositivo

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    One day we'll see cuisine magazines refusing to publish recipes on the moral ground that some people might raise their cholesterol levels by cooking.
     
  21. StoneNYC

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    +1


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk