Photomechanical filters

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by humdee, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. humdee

    humdee Member

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    Does anyone know the difference between a Kodak Wratten Gel Filter and a Kodak Wratten Photomechanical Filter with the same number?

    Thanks
     
  2. artonpaper

    artonpaper Subscriber

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    My limited experience suggests that the Kodak Wratten Photomechanical Filter is sturdier. They will be handled much more than the gel filters. In theory both would have the same light absorption qualities.
     
  3. AgX

    AgX Member

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    No.

    http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Kodak-Wratten-PM22-Photomechanical-Filter-10-2cm-4x4-Square-NEW-Old-Stock-/00/s/MTA2M1gxMDk0/z/q44AAOxywCJRbkGU/$T2eC16R,!)kE9s4Z+l5jBRbkGUQQg!~~60_57.JPG

    This is the backside of of a envelope printed as carrying a "Wratten Photomechanical Filter".
    As you see the text indicates that it is a cutable, not to be touched filter. Thus a gel filter.


    Maybe as colour seperation filters can also be used for pictorial photography Kodak just packed those useful/intended for colour seperation work also in those special envelopes.
     
  4. humdee

    humdee Member

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    Thanks for the replies.
    Both types of filters are gels and they both have exactly the same handling warning on the package. The only difference I can see is that the surface of the Photomechanical filters seems to be just about completely smooth, while the "regular" Wratten gels are usually a little bit "dimply." Could the Photomechanical filters be a slightly higher quality?
     
  5. edp

    edp Member

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    The best "photomechanical filter" is the spinning turbine on a Goerz Hypergon.