pinhole redux!

Discussion in 'Pinhole Photography' started by maxn, Feb 5, 2005.

  1. maxn

    maxn Member

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    Hi All,
    I just got back into pinhole after almost a 4 year "break" from it. This
    is the best image from my new cardboard camera in the past few days:


    [​IMG]


    Also, in case people are interested, I have plans for an 8x10 multi shot
    pinhole design which works pretty well. The only thing that isnt ideal is a
    change in the "focal length" depending on the shot number. This can
    be mitigated by a smarted choice of material than Lexan, though. Anyway,
    its a cheaper solution than an 8x10 field cam + holders and is fun to build
    (like all ponhole cams!). Tell me what you think:

    http://perutz.salk.edu/~mnanao/pinhole/plans.html

    max
     
  2. John Bartley

    John Bartley Member

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    What do I think ?

    I think it's an absolutely COOL idea :smile: I think your woodworking skills are also to be commended, not just the design and the resulting photograph.
     
  3. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    This is similar (but reverse operation) to a design I've seen on f/295, the pinhole photography group -- which, itself, was a reinvention of the falling (glass) plate cameras that were sold in 4x5 size from around 1890 until about 1920 or so. The original falling plate cameras had a mechanism that move the plate stack forward to maintain the same film plane through all exposures, and I think the one on f/295 also does so -- one advantage of falling plates.

    Bad news is, for a pinhole camera, you have to have a "focal" length longer than the vertical dimension of your film. Good news is, you don't have to have expensive 8x10 holders or reload in a changing bag to take more than one shot.

    I'm working on a design that may solve both problems -- a rotary multi-holder design that will produce a wide-angle camera capable of three or four shots. Made in a three pound coffee can or gallon paint can, it might be possible to accomodate 8x10 in one.
     
  4. maxn

    maxn Member

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    thanks for the comments! Donald, I'd love to see your design. I'm getting back into it, but I'm
    living abroad (France) and dont have the tools etc to re-make my multi shot, so I'd love to
    see alternative methods.

    I forgot to mention that it has a tripod mount too. This inspired even stranger looks and more
    questions, if that is possible, than when I was shooting with my Toyo 45AII. As an added
    note, if you guys are sick of questions about your LF/pinhole rigs, try understanding them and
    answering them in a language that you barely speak!
     
  5. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    Max, most of my pinhole stuff is going on f/295 now -- if you're interested in pinholing, that's probably the place for it (the whole place is pinhole, like this whole place is film). There aren't a huge number of active members, but that also means it's easier to keep up with the traffic on the forums there, and everyone there is a pinholer or wants to be a pinholer.

    That's where I'll post the construction photos of my rotary. Basic synopsis, however: a rotating unit inside a round cookie tin will hold three (or in a larger tin, four) 9x12 or 4x5 (depending on the tin) films, with an indexed operating knob on the bottom of the camera. Top loading, of course, and yes, it'll have a tripod mount.
     
  6. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Donald, there are some gargantuan (ok, semi-gargantuan) industrial size Danish butter cookie tins out there. I have bummed a couple empties so I didn't have to patronize the politically-incorrect store than sells them :O)

    Maybe I'm exaggerating, but I'll guess it's a 2-2.5 gallon cookie cavern, uh, can. I guess that's no big deal, considering there are 55 gallon drums, garbage cans, etc. Nice typical cookie tin id.

    M
     
  7. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Cookie tin LID, not ID.
     
  8. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Oh, BTW, MAXN, I like the original image. The contrasting curves are interesting and the wall at right gives a huge depth perspective.

    Theh plans are always interesting and helpful to see also.