Pix of your home-built cams here please

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by nick mulder, Aug 31, 2005.

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  1. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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  2. SMBooth

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    Front view of just finished 6 x 17, need to do final check for focus and then check for light leaks. Folded 2mm aluminum finish in leatherette with Australian redgum trim.
     

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  3. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Nice. I think my next one might be 6 x 17. Could you post some pictures of the interior and the pressure plate which I assume is mounted to the back. Your body construction looks similar to my 6 x 12 in layout and I am interested in seeing how other people do it.


    Steve.
     
  4. SMBooth

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    I have not got any recent internal images, but well get some tomorrow for you. As for the pressure plate that why I asked about yours :smile: , as yet I have not done it , but last time I used some 6mm draft stop foam with double sided tape which worked quite OK. This time I would like something a bit more refined but I don't have access to flash machinery. So I need to think about it more.
     

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  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Oh yes!

    Mine looks like this inside. Behind the two little captive bolts are a couple of leaf springs from an old Mamiya C33 camera. The plate design is copied from the Mamiya but stretched to cover the format.


    Steve.
     

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  6. SMBooth

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    a inside shot, sans the pressure plate which is work in progress. Left that problem to last hoping it would solve itself.
     

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  7. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    That's often my method of solving problems. If I ignore it and get on with doing something else, a solution often presents itself.

    The Mamiya pressure plate mechanism is quite well designed and might be worth copying. Otherwise a rigid plate attached to the back by a piece of foam or sponge might work. You need a pair of rails for the film to run against then another pair of rails slightly higher so that when the pressure plate is up against them, there is just enough gap for the film and its backing paper.

    How much space do you have between the film plane and the back?


    Steve.
     
  8. SMBooth

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    The rails are there, I do have a couple of pressure plate and springy bits from 2 35mm cameras that I was going to use but in my cleverness to put a hidden sliding counter hole I overlooked the problem that it gets in the way of one of the plates. I have about 6mm to play with depth wise and most likely go back to the foam strip idea (which work well last time), or I toyed with the idea of hinging the plate to the film box which you flip out of the way when loading film and just having a couple of spring epoxyed to the back to provide some light pressure when the lid was closed. One of the big problems is making sure the pressure plate is reliable in seating between the rails when you close the back up.
     
  9. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Another option, which I think you have the space for, is to have the pressure plate fixed rather than sprung. Load the film then put the pressure plate on top of it and fix it in place with some screws leaving just enough space for the film to transport smoothly. It doesn't need to be spring loaded, this is just a convention to make film loading easier and not having to have tight tolerances on the film rails to back/pressure plate dimensions.


    Steve.
     
  10. bliorg

    bliorg Member

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    Don't know if I've posted this here, but this is the latest revival of my fixed-focus 4x5, the Neretta Mk II:

    [​IMG]
    Neretta Mk II, rev 03... by Scott --, on Flickr

    Based on Sandeha Lynch's design, has a Graflok back and a (new to me) Linhof-select 90/6.8 Angulon on front. Mortise and tenon joinery in mahogany. Need to figure out a hood now...
     
  11. werra

    werra Member

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  12. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Nice. The fact that we can get lenses with built in shutters and film holders with built in dark slides means that we can get great results with the most simple of cameras, as your foam core example shows. All we really need is a box to keep the darkness in with a lens at one end and the film holder at the other.

    This makes it easy for any of us to make a camera and is doesn't matter if we are master craftsmen or bodgers with gaffer tape!


    Steve.
     
  13. moki

    moki Member

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    Hehe, I love that wording. All the people who try to keep the light out, probably understood something wrong :laugh:

    I built a few boxes myself and it wasn't easy to collect enough darkness, put it inside and then seal the whole thing. Most of these boxes have a hole insted of a lens, though. This one's an old Kiev magazine (the camera was broken beyond repair) with with a 35mm/175 pinhole. And no, I didn't throw it into a mirror to test its sturdiness :wink:

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. bobmercier

    bobmercier Member

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  16. Steve Smith

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    Seems to work o.k. What lens is currently on it?


    Steve.
     
  17. werra

    werra Member

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    Or 260/9 Konica Hexanon GRII, if you like wider view. I found mine dirt cheap, EUR35 (~US$50). Hard to beat price/performance.
     
  18. Jeff Searust

    Jeff Searust Member

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    New 6x17 pano camera

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  19. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Wow. that looks bomb proof!


    Steve.
     
  20. McFortner

    McFortner Member

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    Now that looks nifty! Makes me want one of my own.
     
  21. polka

    polka Member

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    urPOLKa : panoramic pinhole camera

    This was my first "Panoramische Oberlicht Loch Kamera.

    Using 120 rollfilm formed as a cylinder of 80mm diameter.

    Giving 4 pictures of 55x175mm per roll

    Horizontal angle : 250°

    Paul

    First picture : the camera is open, ready for loading a roll
    Second picture : 2 views of closed camera ready for shooting :
    - left : backside with 2 film spooling buttons
    - right : frontside with shutter and viewfinder
     

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  22. himself

    himself Member

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    that thing looks great!!

    I thought I'd add a couple shots of my newly finished creation.

    it takes a 6x9 back and 3x4 polaroid film back and has tilt/swing, a little lift but not shift. I made it entirely out of recycled and scavenged parts, but the lens board was made by a collagist friend of mine.

    the runners need redesigning and I could do with a lens with a bit more coverage for full movements, but beggars can't be choosers.

    this is my first full build so be nice :wink:
    a camera.jpg
     
  23. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    That thing looks awesome! Makes me want one! Whether it works or not, it looks like it was pulled straight out of a Home & Garden home design add. One of those shabby/chic/modern room design articles or something....
     
  24. himself

    himself Member

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    not sure how to take that :wink:

    but thanks and it does really work like, I've only taken one shot so far and was gob-smacked to see that there weren't any light leaks or anything
     
  25. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    haha... I can't blame him for saying that honestly. I mean, you did employ Paisley bellows afterall! :laugh:
     
  26. himself

    himself Member

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    :laugh:

    oh yea? yea? I'll 'ave you know that welsh pears are the bellows of choice 'round my way
     
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