pl/pd pain in the wallet!

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Jarvman, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

    Messages:
    733
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Location:
    Cardiff, Uni
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just ordered the essentials for some first time platinum and palladium printing from bostick and sullivan last night and knew it was going to be expensive, but perhaps wasn't prepared to pay £433 or around $600! I want to do some for the end of year degree show. The contact printing frame makes up around a quarter of this. I was wondering whether I could get one second hand easily enough or whether there was a way of avoiding getting one and using something else. would 2 sheets of glass simply do? Are there any corners I could cut to save some money? Obviously I need the chemistry but I mean in regards to the peripheral stuff.
     
  2. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,948
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Location:
    South Norfol
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Very dedicated. I trust that you will be the sole exhibitor of pt/pd prints?

    Tom.
     
  3. Davec101

    Davec101 Member

    Messages:
    896
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Location:
    Cambridge, U
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    For prints upto 10x8inchs a simple clip frame will do you fine, any larger you might consider purchasing a Vacuum frame. You can sometimes find these secondhand on ebay under 'UV exposure unit' or 'UV platemaker' and usually reasonably priced. In relation to your B&S order you will still have a customs fee to pay which includes import tax duty ( i think its around 17%) and customs handling charge (around £20), so also bare that in mind. You might want to value the items under the tax threshold, although they will only be insured for that value. Good luck.
     
  4. Joe Lipka

    Joe Lipka Member

    Messages:
    809
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2002
    Location:
    Cary, North
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I used a single piece of glass and some foam underneath for almost a decade before I purchased a vacuum frame. I set the UV light unit on top of the glass to hold the negative tight against the paper.

    On my web site I show the process I go through to make a pt/pd print. That might help you some.

    From the home page click on the digital negative link.
     
  5. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    17,979
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    There are lots of second hand contact frames out there. All of mine are second hand, and none cost half of what you paid, not that it isn't nice to have a new contact frame. My favorite is a Kodak pin registered frame designed for dye transfer. Old Century frames are pretty good too.

    Avoid the newer Premier frames--they're kind of light in construction. Also, avoid the frames that have clips that go around the perimeter of the frame, rather than a leaf spring hinged in the center of the frame--they don't apply enough pressure in the center of the frame.
     
  6. PVia

    PVia Member

    Messages:
    813
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Location:
    Pasadena, CA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've been making argyrotypes in preparation for pt/pd work (just to get the hang of the techniques and process), and was able to find a hand-made Pelland 8x10 frame for under $100. Now, that is way more than you can find an old frame for but it's craftsmanship is unequalled. I don't think Dan is making these anymore but there are plans on his website.
     
  7. asp.artist

    asp.artist Member

    Messages:
    144
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
    I got a nice one from Photographers Formulary. Check them out.
     
  8. Akki14

    Akki14 Member

    Messages:
    1,873
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    London, UK
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Ole suggested a clipframe with the backing cut in half, then you can remove half of the backing like a splitback frame. I've not tried this, though. What size are you contact printing? Smaller frames come up on ebay often, although usually in the medium format size rather than 4x5 size.
     
  9. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,522
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There are LOTS of old contact printing frames, in varying condition, listed on Ebay. Oftentimes you can get them for very little money as they get written up as "picture frames" instead. You may also be able to find someone local who is all but, or even in actual fact, giving them away. If you do go ahead with buying the Bostick & Sullivan frame, it is without doubt worth it. I have had mine for several years now and I use it constantly. Whatever route you choose, pick a frame at least one size bigger than the largest you plan to print, so you will have room to work, and you'll have room to grow, should you decide to go up in format.
     
  10. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

    Messages:
    733
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Location:
    Cardiff, Uni
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yeah Tom, there won't even be a grain of silver in the place, just wall to wall inkjets. They're gonna be 10x8's on 11x14" paper Heather. PVia, that sounds a sensible idea. I Don't know if I'm really ready for it just yet but what the hell. The Kodak pin registered sounds like it could be good, I'll keep an eye out.
     
  11. Justin Cormack

    Justin Cormack Member

    Messages:
    181
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Location:
    London
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Its hard to find second hand frames over 8x10 unfortunately. I have never seen one in the UK though I only look occasionally.
     
  12. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,522
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yes, bigger than 8x10 is tough, especially in good condition. I got lucky once though- I bought a batch of frames on ebay. The lot was described as a handful of 5x7 frames, an 8x10, and an 11x14 or two. I paid $25. When I went to pick it up, I was handed a dozen 5x7 frames, 2 8x10s, 3 11x14s, a 14x17, and a 12x20. A discussion ensued about printing methods, and then I was offered an easel. This is no ordinary easel. An old Kodak easel which can handle 20x25 images with a 5" border. I can barely lift the thing. Then the film holders came pouring out of the storage locker too... 11x14s, 7x11s, 5x7s, 4x5s, and some whole plate stuff too. If I had had a van, and not just a coupe, I would have bought all his Omega enlargers off of him as well... he had three Omega 4x5 enlargers with dichroic heads.

    Point being, folks still have these treasure troves stashed away in basements places, and sometimes they'll unload them on you when they detect a friendly face.
     
  13. Jim Fitzgerald

    Jim Fitzgerald Member

    Messages:
    1,798
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Location:
    Ventura, Ca
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Scott, way to go! Nice to get the big contact frames but the 11x14 film holders... now I jealous!!

    Jim
     
  14. Lukas Werth

    Lukas Werth Member

    Messages:
    266
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If costs are an issue, they may be significantly reduced by ordering noble metals separately as single salts from other, non-photographic sources, and preparing the required double salt yourself. You get them, for instance, from precious metal separating works. If you now start for the first time, you might perhaps prefer to get the ready-made stuff, but it is worth asking a company whether they are able to sell this also.


    By the way, my website is currently offline due to a shift of my residence; I apologize for this.
     
  15. sly

    sly Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,498
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Location:
    Nanaimo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use a sheet of 16x20 glass scavenged from an "artwork" bought for $1 at a thrift store, and a piece of counter top cut to match picked up at the local re-cycle joint. I bought clamps (new ones!) at the hardware store. Of course I carefully inspected the glass for defects and the chunk of countertop for flatness. The edges of the glass have been taped to prevent cuts, and the edge of the counter sanded. I use a piece of mat board between the counter top and my paper, just in case there are contaminants in the surface. It doesn't allow me to develop by inspection - but as I don't do any DOP, I'm not fussed.
    Watch out for those taxes and duty and all - I once paid 2/3rds of the cost of my item! If it is possible to get something in your country, don't order from some where else!
     
  16. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

    Messages:
    733
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Location:
    Cardiff, Uni
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My cousin is doing a carpentry degree so he's going to knock me something together, pretty much what you just described Sly, the only difference being the glass will have a wooden banding around it and will be hinged to the wooden base. That means I can spend more money on OHP film and paper :smile: