Plain hypo fix for negatives?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by spiritlake, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. spiritlake

    spiritlake Member

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    So I just recently re-set-up my darkroom, and I have Sodium Thiosulphate and Sodium Sulfite.
    I was planning to use F-4 from photographer's formulary for my neg fix, but I'm still waiting on it to come in and getting antsy...

    Has anyone used a Sodium Thiosulphate based fixer for negatives? I've read some on the forums of folks using tf-2 for Pyro negatives, but nothing else about using a Sodium Thiosulphate fix for negatives. Any success / failure stories, times, recipes, etc. would be welcome!
     
  2. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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  3. spiritlake

    spiritlake Member

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    Isn't that for VDB prints though?
    I'd glanced through it once before and the promising-looking links are sadly broken...
     
  4. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Before the popularity of rapid fixers based on ammonium thiosulfate people routinely fixed film and papers using sodium thiosulfate. Ansel Adams gives the following formula for a plain hypo bath

    warm water 750 ml
    Sodium thiosulfate 250 g
    Water to make 1 l

    Fixing time is 5 to 10 minutes.
     
  5. desertrat

    desertrat Subscriber

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    Since you also have sodium sulfite, you can add that to your plain hypo fixer and it should last longer. Plain hypo fixers deteriorate pretty fast, I believe. 30 grams of sodium sulfite added to the above recipe is similar to some old recipes in Photographic Facts and Formulas (1924).
     
  6. spiritlake

    spiritlake Member

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    That's so helpful! I thought it should work, I'd just only seen the AA fixer used with fibre paper and wasn't sure on times. Thanks!
     
  7. john_s

    john_s Subscriber

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    Thiosulphate plus sulphite is a good long lasting fixer. Have a look at:

    http://www.heylloyd.com/technicl/plain.htm

    The only issue might be that "new technology" films are supposed to fix better (or at least faster) in an ammonium thiosulphate fixer (i.e. "rapid fixer"). I don't know if rapid fixer is necessary.

    One advantage of using a cheap fixer is that you can be a bit more generous in discarding used fixer before it causes damage (more of a problem with paper than film).
     
  8. panchro-press

    panchro-press Member

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    A sodium thiosulphate fixer works fine for film and paper. I used one for many years. I would caution that a plain 'hypo' leaves the surface of film quite soft and vulnerable to scratches. With proper care, this shouldn't be much of an issue.
    -30-
     
  9. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    all I use now is pure hypo...since the volume volume volume of fix I use is large with big sheets, I end up tossing the stuff after use--no saving...so I use pure hypo...it's very cheap anyways---mix fresh, use for a cuple of rolls and toss it....no muss no fuss...get if from a pool chemical place...no other admixtures is necessary I've found--never had a problem with soft emulsion yet