Plus-X ca. 1960 - is that look still possible today?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mhanc, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. mhanc

    mhanc Member

    Messages:
    274
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2008
    Location:
    NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have recently seen some 35mm Plus-X shots taken 50 or so years ago. I was quite struck by the photos - a very pleasing dramatic but lively retro look.

    I am sure a lot of what I am reacting to is attributable to the exposure and development skills of the photographer (not to mention the equipment of that era); however, I am wondering if this is achievable with today's Plus-X. The Kodak technical publication of 2007 states that new technology is used to manufacture the film but users can expect the same results.

    Does any one have any experience in using this film over a long time period?

    I am just wondering if the new technology uses a different base, less silver, etc. and, therefore, changes the look vis-a-vis that of 50 years ago. I have experimented with the Adox CHS 100 and like really like the look of that film which is similar to that I saw in the old Plus-X photos.

    Also - Perhaps more important than the film, any recommended developers and/or development techniques that would help in achieve these results?

    Thanks
     
  2. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

    Messages:
    7,114
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Location:
    In a darkroo
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    I'm not sure what look you're referring to but I would think period chemistry would get you in the ballpark.
     
  3. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,591
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    check this thread out:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/61727-what-film-how-achieve-rich-grey-tones.html

    it isn't quite the same, but there are suggestions that might apply to what you are looking to do ...

    i do not know any way to make a modern emulsion look like it was processed/printed 45+ years ago,
    other than through experimenting with one film, and one developer with varying dilutions and developing techniques.

    good luck!

    john