PMK Pyro Developer Times - Book of Pyro the only source?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by wilfbiffherb, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    Hi All,

    Im really getting into PMK pyro. i have developed one roll of trix and it seemed to come out fine. I have some FP4+ and some Pan F+ along with trix that i will be shooting on an upcoming holiday to scotland. my question is what speed should i rate these films at and then develop? i have googled my butt off but all i find is references to the book of pyro and the massive dev chart (which i tend not to believe). can anyone help at all??
     
  2. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Subscriber

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    I use PMK a lot with FP4 and Tri-X.

    FP4: EI-80. Develop in PMK 1+2+100 for 7 minutes at 75 degrees (24C).

    Tri-X: EI 200. Develop in PMK 1+2+100 for 9 minutes at 75 degrees (24C).

    Some examples:

    FP4
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Tri-X
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    wow thanks chris - looks fantastic. have you used pan f with this at all? maybe i should just stick with rodinal for this film... really like your examples - thanks for the tips!
     
  4. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Subscriber

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    I haven't tried PMK with Pan-F. I stopped using Pan-F because it became hard to get where I live. Now, all films are hard to get where I live and I order everything online now, so I should try it again. I loved Pan-F in Rodinal 1+50, it was a great combination.

    I've gotten great results with PMK and Tmax 100 and 400, Tri-X, FP4, Fomapan 100, and Fuji Acros.
     
  5. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    I have used PMK since 1994, wow, so for a while now. I usually double the exposure of the box speed with the usual caveats. There are many variations of staining developers, but this one has served me well and I'm more in to making a great image than testing developers my whole life.

    I rate my fp4 at 64 (close to what chris does) which is about a stop less than box speed. There are times I rate it much faster though and develop the hec out of it.

    My times are 12 min at the above temps in a rotary processor. (mostly 8x10 sheet film)

    I would simply recommend doing a test roll and seeing if you like what you get.

    One can get a great negative from just about any developer, it's a mater of getting to know it.
     
  6. ROL

    ROL Member

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  7. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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  8. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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  9. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Subscriber

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  10. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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  11. john_s

    john_s Member

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    PMK weakens during development, presumably due to oxidation and depletion. This would depend on the amount of developer per film and the amount of air in the tank and agitation. For me, a 35mm film in a 250mL tank with only a little air in it seemed to exhaust the developer at a convenient contrast so that extra time made no practical difference. I discovered this when I tried for more contrast deliberately.

    Yes, I am aware that 250mL is less than the recommended volume for 80sq.in of film. But presumably it's not less than the amount used by people doing rotary processing.