Polarizing Filter - What is the best method for RF Cameras?

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by Michael Ta, Dec 16, 2007.

  1. Michael Ta

    Michael Ta Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I wonder which methods are the most common for using effectively polarizing filters on RF cameras. Any experience with FilterView of PhotoEquip?
     
  2. matti

    matti Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Location:
    Stockholm, S
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use my lightmeter in the camera. Leica M6.
    /matti
     
  3. Andy K

    Andy K Member

    Messages:
    9,422
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Location:
    Sunny Southe
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  4. vanspaendonck

    vanspaendonck Member

    Messages:
    132
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Location:
    Amsterdam, T
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    How?
    I have a M6 TTL and an older Leitz polarizing filter and have always found it awkward to have to observe the subject through the filter first, rotating it in my hand, mark the orientation, screw it onto the lens, set the orientation of the filter, and then finally take the shot.
    Do you perhaps turn the filter untill you get the lowest light reading? Does that produce good results?
     
  5. David Henderson

    David Henderson Member

    Messages:
    342
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Location:
    Datchet, Ber
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Use a polariser with plenty of edge markings . Hold it to the eye and note the point at which the effect you want is achieved. Put polariser on lens and recreate that point. Expose by using manufacturer data on filter factor to adjust metered exposure- in my case two stops for most polarisers, 1.5 for my most recent B+W. I prefer to use filter factors than to meter through a polariser anyway since that risks compensating for some of the effect I'm using the filter to create, so the only difference between a rangefinder and slr for me is that with a slr I twiddle the polariser after I put it on the lens, and with a RF I twiddle it before.
     
  6. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

    Messages:
    2,294
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Location:
    Floriduh
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Not too long ago from what I remember when reading one of the photo magazines there was a set sold of two filters both with edge markings. One for the hand and one on the camera. Of course it can be done when buying two of the same brand and marked as long as the markings concur.
     
  7. Amund

    Amund Member

    Messages:
    902
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Location:
    Oslo,Norway
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I don`t use a polarizer when using a rangefinder, problem solved :smile:
     
  8. pauledell

    pauledell Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Polarizing filter for RF cameras

    I used 1/4" Dymo embossing tape typing numbers seperated by periods ( 1 thru 12) and applied it around the outside edge of the filter. By turning the
    filter until the desired effect is acquired and observing the reference number
    then placing the filter to the lens so the reference is located in the same
    location. It seems to work fairly well for me.
    Paul
     
  9. Lee L

    Lee L Member

    Messages:
    3,246
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That would be the Kenko set mentioned by Andy K. The viewing filter fits in a hot shoe or is hand held.

    Leica makes/used to make a polarizing filter with a swing arm. You swing it up in front of the viewfinder, set it for the desired effect, then swing it back 180 degrees in front of the lens where the effect is identical. Don't know the current price/availability.

    Comments by others in the thread about methods for getting the orientation on camera to the same as when viewing are on the mark.

    I'd be surprised if two random polarizers by the same mfgr are aligned to ring markings. Of course you could make your own markings on two filters and go from there, or maybe loosen the retaining ring(s) and rotate the filter glass in the mount(s) so that markings match.

    Lee
     
  10. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

    Messages:
    1,504
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Location:
    Westminster,
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Mamiya has a unique Polarizer for their 7 II medium format rangefinders. It's on two swing arms which allow you to swing the filter up for correct viewing to adjust the filter, and to take the exposure reading, since the camera does not do ttl metering. Then once the filter is set and exposure calculated, the filter swings down over the lens for shooting.

    That said, I do use Polarizers on my Leicas. Simpler to shoot B&W. Grin.
     
  11. matti

    matti Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Location:
    Stockholm, S
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yes, when I get the lowest light reading the effect on the sky is the largest. Not really acurate to know what it looks like. But I like the results.
    /matti
     
  12. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,559
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2007
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    You simply hold the filter to your eye, turn the polarizer until you like the results, then note the position on the white mark... 12 oclock, 2 oclock etc. Screw the filter on the lens. Turn the filter to the appropriate "oclock" (make sure you take into consideration vertical or horizontal orientation." Add 1.3 stops of exposure (or 1.5 if you can't use 1/3rd stops), and take the image. It's really that simple.