Polaroid 360/fujFPi3000b

Discussion in 'Instant Cameras, Backs and Film' started by MichaelT72, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. MichaelT72

    MichaelT72 Member

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    I recently converted the Polaroid 360 to use (2) AAA batteries. But I've found that the lighten/darken wheel must be turned to lighten almost 3 "marks" , even when I'm exposing in bright outdoor lighting. I'm wondering if the electronic exposure function has become less responsive because of the age of camera? Any info on this? Thanks.
     
  2. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    Michael,

    I have a 350 and I use lithium battery thin and circular, very small. May be camera standarts and Fuji doesnt go hand in hand, may be batteries were weak or age of camera. Did you ckean the small lens ?

    Umut
     
  3. MichaelT72

    MichaelT72 Member

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    Mustafa, thanks for your input. This was the first time using the fuji3000 film in this camera. I had previously used the fuji100C in the camera & the exposure wheel needed no adjustment...perfect exposure. Batteries were checked and had full voltage. I hadn't checked the "small lens" for cleaniing...forgot all about that! I'll have to inspect it. Possibly fuji3000 film may be a bit more critical on exposure, but many people are sure glad to have this black & white peel apart instant film for their packfilm cameras.
     
  4. Ezzie

    Ezzie Member

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    I too have to adjust more to lighten for FP3000B than FP100C on my 250. I have also made a work around for the camera's general tendancy for underexposure. A piece of cellotape over the electric eye coloured red with a marker pen. Measured the effect with a light meter, and it adds a stop to the exposure. Now it works more or less as one would expect, at least for FP100C, lightening only if there is a large bright area in the frame, or in contre-jour situations.
     
  5. inlarry

    inlarry Member

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    I've noticed the same issue on my 360, but only outdoors. It seems the camera's can't quite cope with the 3000 speed film in bright settings too well.
     
  6. MichaelT72

    MichaelT72 Member

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    Ezzie, thanks for that red cellotape method. I'll have to try that. On another 360 issue, after much searching, found a company(Batteries America) that sold the appropriate ni-cad batteries for the flash unit, so was able to get that working properly as well. Just took a gamble the the capacitor still functioned & it did...just needed recycling several times to build up the proper charge. The instructions for this repair were on The Land List site.
     
  7. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    It would be more responsive to give a faster shutter speed.

    Back in the day, one could choose from a number of color coded photocells to adjust the response. Of course you won't be able to find those today, so I'd be satisfied if a suitable exposure can be obtained within the range of the cameras adjustment.
     
  8. inlarry

    inlarry Member

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    One thing to note is that you said you'd used FP100C without adjustment...it's worth saying that these cameras were setup for 75/80 film originally, which could be why they work well without adjusting on a 100 speed media. At 3000, they underexpose. I've read a lot of people have this same issue, and Landlist seems to agree that the best reasoning is simply that the camera's themselves with age tend to lean towards underexposure.

    Does anyone know what type of metering cells these use? Selenium/CdS/something else? Knowing this may help narrow down the source?

     
  9. aterimagery

    aterimagery Member

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    The way that exposure ring on all or at least most of the 200+ series pack film cameras works is that it just slides what is essentially a graduated neutral density filter in front of the CdS cell (the "electric eye" which I'm pretty sure is CdS based on this manual I found) to control the amount of light hitting the cell. So set it to "overexpose" by +2EV and internally you're literally just sliding a -3EV ND filter in place. Set it to -1EV and you get 0 ND filter.

    The other thing is that the little PC sync plug for the flash has this other funky slit next to the PC connector for the old style flashbulb flash. When the flash plug gets inserted into this, a little scrim (opaque screen that blocks some percentage of light, similar to an ND filter) gets placed over the "eye" in addition to the ND filter strip. I'm not sure what this is about though, perhaps something to do with the slow-burning disposable flashbulbs. When I hook modern strobes up to it it works fine, but the photo gets screwed up if I stick something in there to put the scrim in place. (Or maybe inserting something moved it out of the way... don't remember.)

    I think it's possible that low battery voltage could have some impact on the exposure time because that CdS cell is basically a variable resistor that changes depending on how much light hits it, and it appears that the shutter closes after it lets a certain amount of charge (mA/sec) through. If you have less voltage though then it should let current through more slowly for a given amount of light and cause a longer exposure, but the thing might have a voltage regulator to prevent that. (I'd hope so.)

    Anyway, I also have to set the thing to +2 stops brighter to get a proper exposure. My theory as to why is that plastic gel-type ND filters do fade over time (which is why lighting gels have to be replaced every so often). So the gel fades out and the -3EV ND filter becomes like -1EV. If 0EV (no filter) is the "1 darker" setting then -1EV ND blockage would make the -3EV ND "two ticks lighter" filter turn into a -1EV ND filter, making "two ticks lighter" become what "no ticks lighter/darker" should be.

    I usually use ISO 100 FP-100C film and set the film sensitivity knob to 75 on my 250, so I'd need to lower the exposure a bit anyway. With 3000 film you could set the wheel closer to 1500 (if you have that setting) to give it another stop of light which should allow you to turn the exposure knob down one tick.

    I also thought about just cutting up little bits of this -1/2EV neutral density gel and taping a few of them to the camera. If I need to raise the exposure more then I just tape however many of them I need over the eye. That effectively gives you manual shutter speed control, limited only by the number of ND gel strips you have and what density they are.

    A red marker may work, but since it's basically blocking cyan to reduce the amount of light, the amount of light it absorbs is going to change depending on the color temperature of the light. At 6500K sunlight outside it will block more light than at 2800K with incandescent lights inside because there's more cyan-range light in 6500K daylight for example. A lot more toward dusk when the color temp is like 9000K.

    (Id post a photo showing the little ND filter slider but it looks like I forgot to take photos of it when I took the thing apart.)

    Other than actually getting an ND filter gel (you might be able to buy a small one somewhere made for use on speedlights for like $2) I'm not sure what the best hack would be for making your own.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 5, 2012