Polaroid Emulsion Transfer?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Bighead, Aug 24, 2005.

  1. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    I've met a local artist, two actually, who use this technique. Could someone explain the process in simple terms and maybe also give me some hint as to where I can find some detailed procedures?
     
  2. mikeb_z5

    mikeb_z5 Member

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  3. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    also, check out Kathleen Carr's book on Polaroid tranfers
     
  4. Shmoo

    Shmoo Member

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    You might also email Polaroid and ask them for the demo CD they made with instructions on all of the Polaroid techniques. It had written instructions as well as short videos on transfers, lifts, and manipulations.

    S
     
  5. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

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  6. doughowk

    doughowk Subscriber

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  7. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

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    I guess no one has explained the two techniques yet to finish answering your question, so here we go:

    There are two techniques: One is emulsion lift, the other is image transfer. Both can be done with several types of Polaroid color film, any of the ones the end in "9", like Type 59 or Type 669.

    For an emulsion lift, the polaroid print is left to set up for about 24 hours or more after development. Then it is heated in hot water for about 4 minutes which softens the adhesive layer between the emulsion film and the paper back. The hot print is then transferred to a pan of water at room temperature. The emulsion is gently lifted/peeled away from the backing. Then it it placed upside down on a temporary receive and stretched/scrunched as desired. Then it is pressed down on the final receiver surface which can be anything, and manipulated to the desire final form.

    There is two methods for the image transfer, one where the receiving paper is wet, the other where it is dry. I won't go into the details on this for brevity. For both methods, the film is developed for about 10 seconds, then peeled apart and the negative pressed against the receiver paper. It then sits for several minutes, then it is separated from the receiver. The emulsion actually transfers onto the receiver in this process. The type of paper used for the receiver is critical. Follow what is recommended in the books and you will save yourself a lot of grief.

    Of the two methods, I find the emulsion lift to be the easiest to do. The transfer is more finicky and takes only to certain papers. With the transfer method though, you can also use the underdeveloped print for a lift.

    I will be posting a transfer later tonight in the Experimental Gallery. Both are fun. Good luck.
     
  8. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    just a tip for lifts, get some of that shelve paper that is sticky on one side, place the image on a piece and the emulsion will float right off of this backing,when the heat is high enough; use a piece of acetate by sliding under the emulsion to help keep it under control.

    altho the literature does suggest waiting 24 hours before attempting the lift, we have used a hair dryer to speed up the dying and in fact, i forgot one day and after about 15 minutes dropped an image in hot water, no problems , worked fine. Wouldn't make a habit of doing that with out some sort of forced heating.
     
  9. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

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    Bighead,

    I hung a show of 25 e-lifts and transfers this month. I had a blast with the process. I mostly shot floral still lifes and toys. If you'd like I could send you a cd with great information. It helped me a lot with my polaroids.

    Alan.
     
  10. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    Are you kidding? Yeah, that would be great!!!! I will IM my address to you... In return, I'll send you one of my "successful" attempts...
     
  11. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

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    Alan, were your prints the 4x5 originals or did you reproduce and enlarge them?