Poor Man's Rotary Processor

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Born2Late, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. Born2Late

    Born2Late Subscriber

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    I've just been back in the darkroom for a few months after many years away.

    I got an itch to try PF Pyrocat HD in glycol on medium format film and purchased a kit.

    The recommended times are for rotary processing in a Jobo or similar system, of which I have none.

    What I do have is a number of paper drums and a rotary base. The rotary base offers continuous rotation and reversing rotation. Just nosing around, I found that my plastic film tanks fit perfectly inside them.

    Would it work using this somewhat rigged system for rotation, or does the Jobo provide rocking or other agitation besides rotary?

    Also, PF doesn't list times for TMax 100. Any suggestions?

    Thanks
     
  2. madgardener

    madgardener Member

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    Interesting idea, Harbor freight sells a rotary drum for polishing rocks, I could put my tank in the drum. There could be a problem with it however, as I understand the Jobo system(s), I think they also provide heat to keep the temperature steady.
     
  3. henry finley

    henry finley Member

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    My answer comes from another direction to where this discussion might go. I've been in the printing business for quite a few years and grew up with the photographic gadget fever prior to my adult professional life. This is to say I've had to own a lot of gadgets in my day. I say HAD to own only because soon enough it just became more junk in my way. Is there no reason to be satisfied with just the developing tank and using your customary temperature-stabilizing methods, and just forget about trying to set up a production about it? So I say, unless you're needing to ge into some sort of production, be GLAD that you're good enough not to need all that junk, which will certainly become something else in the way collecting dust. I don't say all this to be contrary. The viewpoint is from a guy who would LOVE to get rid of all this printing junk and machinery, and never see another one again. Other than that I think you're just looking to have a streaky-film situation that you'll never satisfactorily remedy.
     
  4. ChristopherCoy

    ChristopherCoy Member

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    On the flip side, rotary processing would allow me to use less chemical... So I too have been looking at using something like a Uniroller base/drum to process my B&W. My hand process has gotten rather sloppy lately and imngetting uneven development, lines, splotches, and ruined images.
     
  5. henry finley

    henry finley Member

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    Yeah, It WOULD do that for sure, on the chemical frugality. I'm trying to picture something like just a Honeywell Nikor tank with the cap pressed on firmly, or taped with electrical tape, or whatever other. Pour in the chemical, snap and tape on the cap and throw 'er down on the rotator. Pick it up and flip it or give it a little shake every so often. Might work. You'll need to work yourself out a new developing time probably. Just remember the old Kodak advice--anything shorter than 5 minutes is looking for trouble. Might actually work just fine.
     
  6. ParkerSmithPhoto

    ParkerSmithPhoto Subscriber

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    Many people use the paper drums to process sheet films. If you have Paterson tanks, just load them up and toss them on the rotary base. It works very well. For the tank that holds 2 120 reels, you may need to add a heavy block (like a brick) on one side to keep the tank from falling off. It's pretty obvious once you start doing it which side it needs to be on.
     
  7. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    very interested. let us knowhow you decide in the end.
     
  8. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Something like this :smile:?:
     

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  9. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I've never had any problems developing any films in Pcat-HD using conventional methods. I stopped using rotary when finances dictated I sell my Jobo. Pcat is relativly inexpensive and mixing 550ml for a single 120 film is cheap. MDC recommends Pcat-HD 1+1+100 for 16mins @ 20c for Tmax 100. Check this site out for more info
    http://www.pyrocat-hd.com/