Potassium Cyanate for Fixing tintypes?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by cynan, Feb 9, 2007.

  1. cynan

    cynan Member

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    Please forgive me for asking,

    I'm chemically inept.:tongue:


    Would Potassium Cyanate (CKNS) work as a fixer (for tintypes) ?

    Wanting to get the 'coffee cream' look Potassium Cyanide gives to images.


    I'm guessing 'NO' is the answer - Just thought I'd ask the experts.

    Thanks
     
  2. JG Motamedi

    JG Motamedi Member

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    No.

    And if you are chemically inept do yourself a favor and use hypo.

    Some have claimed that using rapid fix without hardener gives a more coffee & cream look. I prefer that silver look and happily use hypo.
     
  3. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    A more appropriate or familiar rendering of the formula(s) and name are KSCN or KCNS and Potassium Thiocyanate. I hate to pick nits, but your rendering of it may be unfamiliar to many here who do mix their own chemicals.

    It is not related to Cyanide in any way except superficially.

    In any event, I agree, use hypo.

    PE
     
  4. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It's unfamiliar to at least one person who does mix his own chemicals, and has a university degree in chemistry too.

    There are nits and nits, but chemical nits can be vital. There's a big difference between a "C and an N" and a "-CN", and between an "S and a CN" and a -SCN group.

    Forget "hypo" too, if you can - that's an outdated name which has no meaning outside of photography and even there is frequently confused with "hypo clear" and "hypo eliminator". The correct term is thiosulfate (or -sulphate). When used alone, "hypo" usually means sodium thiosulfate, but there is no guarantee this is correct
     
  5. Jordan

    Jordan Member

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    Count me in as another confused chemist.

    KSCN = potassium thiocyanate
    KCNO = potassium cyanate
    KCN = potassium cyanide

    The chemistry of each of these salts is pretty different. They can all be hazardous, but KCN is much more hazardous than the other two.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2007
  6. RobertP

    RobertP Subscriber

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    potassium cyanate is the active ingredient in products like cyanol. Used for killing crabgrass. It is probably used in a lot of herbicides. As you can tell by looking at my yard I have no experience with it.