Prematurely unwinding a roll of film on FE2

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by mporter012, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. mporter012

    mporter012 Subscriber

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    If you were to take 10 images on 50 speed film, for example, and then needed to use fast film, 800 speed for instance - could you unwind the partially used roll of 50 speed and then put it back in at a later point?

    Just curious about this. I read that you could, but I can't figure out how you would know when to stop winding, so as not to wind the film entirely into the roll, thus rendering the whole thing useless.

    I use a Nikon FE2.

    Thanks!
     
  2. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    You can, but you need to hear/feel when the film disconnects from the take-up spool, and just wind about an extra inch.
    When you reload it, advance it (by shooting) for an extra 2 frames past where you stopped. Use the fastest shutter speed, stopped down all the way, with the lens cap on.
     
  3. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Yes you can. Take a note of the frame counter and write down what number it's on. When rewinding listen and feel for it coming off the take-up spool and then stop rewinding. But even if the leader goes back into the cassette, you can extract it with a leader extractor. When putting it back, put a lens cap on the camera and wind on and shoot to a couple of frames past where you took it out.
     
  4. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Sure, that can be done. When you take the roll out make darn sure you don't roll the leader into the cassette. You can hear the leader coming off of the takeoff spool if you are rewinding slow enough and listening carefully. You can also feel it come off (the tension on the rewind knob will release "all of the sudden"). Then be darn sure to mark the roll with the last exposure number. Then when you put it back into the camera at a later date make darn sure that you are advancing the film in the dark (and/or with a cap, and/or at the fastest shutter speed and smallest aperture) toensure you don't doubleexpose the previously used part of hte film. Also... it is good to "waste some film" and go one or two frames beyond where you left off to ensure you don't have overlapping frames.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    ... eddie and clive must type a lot faster than do I. :smile:
     
  6. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    Brian- Timing is everything... On the bright side, this is one of the few threads where the responses all agree!
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    If you do this with film that is going to be developed by a lab, and are expecting a lab to either return the film in smaller, sleeved strips or, in the case of slides, mounted for projection it is a good idea to leave a note that you have done so.

    Labs shouldn't have trouble with frame lines that are inconsistent, but .....
     
  8. PentaxBronica

    PentaxBronica Member

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    You can recover the film leader if it gets pulled into the cartridge. You need a film leader retriever. I know some people haven't had any luck with them but the Kaiser one I use never needs more than a couple of tries to do the job (usually works first time).
     
  9. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Yes, Kaiser are very good and using one is just a knack (a bit like safe cracking). If it doesn't work first time it will after a few attemps. The problem is if you don't know how to use them and the plastic gets bent.
     
  10. dazey

    dazey Member

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    I do this quite a bit. I was always taught never to allow the leader to disappear into the case to stop light leaking in (especially with well used hand rolled films). It also allows you to put the weight on the film before you go into the dark to open the canister. Just tear the leader if you have finished the film to stop you shooting it twice.
    Only downside is loosing some exposures as others have said.
     
  11. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    The entrance to the cassette has a velvet type fabric inner surface to stop light entering, but don't know what you mean by weight on the film before entering the darkroom. Can you please explain?
     
  12. elekm

    elekm Member

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    I do this often. Get a Sharpie and mark the film leader. I usually write "go to" and the frame number i was on + 1 and the camera.

    So if I was on frame 11, I would write, "FE / Go to 12." That way, you avoid possible overlap.

    Of course, you need to be consistent when loading film. In fact, be consistent in everything that you do in life.
     
  13. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Yes slightly disconcerting, don't you agree :D

    pentaxuser
     
  14. dorff

    dorff Member

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    I have done this a few times in the past, and it works well enough. But be sure to mark your cassette very clearly. To be honest, the potential for trashing photos is not insignificant.

    If you are shooting different types of film often, then you should consider an extra camera body. I know it is not without cost, but it will save you a lot of effort and potential disasters. Way back, I shot only one type of film - Velvia 50, and was happy with one camera. Nowadays, I will find that really difficult. I could shoot B/W or different film speeds with much more freedom once I augmented my FM with an F3. I am sure you will find an FG, EM, FE, FM10, FE10 or similar body for next to nothing if you really look hard enough, and that can be used as the backup body for the type of film you shoot less often. In South Africa such cameras are practically given away.
     
  15. Matthew Wagg

    Matthew Wagg Member

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    This is a big reason for my changing over to medium format. I wanted to be able to swap films mid roll and I didn't fancy spending the kinda money that Rollei 3003's go for so I bought an ETRS.
    My 35mm stuff has relegated to the drawer since I bought it.

    The other option I used to do as well was to have two cameras, one loaded with the slower film and one with the faster. I just couldn't deal with the hassle of swapping films mid roll and the extra chance of blowing the films due to light getting onto it.
     
  16. PentaxBronica

    PentaxBronica Member

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    I have also used it to rescue a film after a camera broke mid roll.

    Most recent case was a Pentax ME-F which appeared to work perfectly (I fired the shutter with no film about seventy times with no problems) then developed the non-cocking shutter problem about six frames into the first roll. As all the M series bodies (apart from the MX) use the same spacing between cartridge, shutter and winding drum I was able to swap it into an ME, fire the shutter with the lens cap on to get past the already exposed frames, then shoot the rest of the roll as normal. Aside from three or four frames which the ME F had spoiled while expiring the rest of the roll was saved.
     
  17. mporter012

    mporter012 Subscriber

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    Great advice, thanks so much.

    My other question is this: I have a few rolls of film (first two I ever attempted to shoot) that i opened up the back of camera on about 3 photos in. Could i still use the last 20 exposures left on these rolls or is everything lost when you open up the back?
     
  18. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    The only potential loss is the film that is already on the take-up spool. So, yes, you can use the rest of the roll with a high probability of success.
     
  19. mporter012

    mporter012 Subscriber

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    That's great! Saving $5!- so if I was on exposure #5, what # would you estimate is safe to start on?

    Thx -
     
  20. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    6, but to be absolutely safe go to 7.
     
  21. dazey

    dazey Member

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    I know it does, but its obviously more effective with film helping block the gap. The way I was taught to process film is you hang a film weight on the leader, go into the dark, open the can, allow the weight to slowly drop to the floor, cut the film off the spool, feed cut end into the spiral and wind it up.
     
  22. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

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    Nikon FGs and FG 20s are so underrated at $20-25
    Saves you the hassles of losing frames, etc
     
  23. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Let me tell you a way that may make things easier for you. When you loaded the camera you wasted about 6" of film excluding the leader. Cut off the the leader and load about 6" of film into the spiral in daylight by vision. Then go into the darkroom or changing bag, pay out the rest of the film and load in total darkness. When the cassette starts to jam up against the spiral, use your finger nails to tear the film fom the cassette.
     
  24. dazey

    dazey Member

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    It did occur to me that this was possible but I have never done it that way! Might give it a go and see if it works for me. I can see that would be needed if using a changing bag but I have always gone for the cupboard option.