print dryer?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Sean, Aug 5, 2003.

  1. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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  2. lee

    lee Member

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    for fliber base print drying just get some plastic window screening and dry the prints on it with air. should take about 4 or 5 hours. Basically overnite. Don't fool with them until dry. Dry them face down and it will help minimize the curling. Squeegee each side on glass before putting them on the screens.

    lee\c
     
  3. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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  4. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    I've used similar ones several years ago. Basically it's a curved metal platen with a heating coil strung underneath it. (The one you linked is two-sided). The apron clamps tightly over the print holding it flat in contact with the heated surface. The prints tend to dry pretty flat with maybe just some edge ripple. The two-sided ones can be loaded on both sides and flipped, but of course the top side dries fastest so you have to work out a system for loading,flipping and removing the dried prints (or you can just use it one-sided and not bother). So all in all, it is probably faster than air drying but the trade-off is that it requires more tending. The problems are: possible fixer contamination of the apron over time and some archivalists used to scream bloody murder at the mere mention of heat drying (which is odd since I rarely heard them bitch vehemently about dry mounting).
    Often the platens are actually ferrotype tins if you are into that. For that you squeegee the prints face down onto the perfectly clean, polished plates and leave the apron up. When they pop off, they're done.
    Hope this helps.

    -Neal
     
  5. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    thanks guys, doesn't look like it's worth the trouble and risk for faster drying.
     
  6. Robert

    Robert Member

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    I'm assuming the prices are NZ dollars. Those print drums [I think Beseler ] might be a good deal if in good condition. You can use those for film to right?
     
  7. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    Noooo , Nooooooo for film. Dryers for film are cabinets, with a fan and heat device, along with filters at the top. Hanging film by clips on a wire or bar running cross wise in the cabinet. Or, some form of the above.
     
  8. Robert

    Robert Member

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    No I meant the beseler colour print drums. Don't some people use them to develop film? The price for the two isn't very high.
     
  9. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    sorry I misunderstood. Some folks do use the drums for film. Similar to the Jobo style of development. You would need a motor base, or roll on a table top. Never tried that myself, but know it is done.
     
  10. Robert Kennedy

    Robert Kennedy Member

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    Not worth the trouble. The UofA darkroom just uses the plastic screen method.

    Actually what they did was pretty neat....

    On the opposite wall is a slab of lucite bolted to the wall with a length of rubber hose attached on the bottom to collect the runoff (and a hose from there goes to a bucket on the floor). You squeegee off on this, and then transfer to the screens on the other side.

    The screens are a neat design. They are mounted on rails in rows under the light table. Each pulls out and in a small area you can get a TON of racks. Much better than making room for ANOTHER piece of equipment....
     
  11. Lex Jenkins

    Lex Jenkins Member

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    I've been using a similar model, a smallish Arkay C-11 print dryer, for several months. Two advantages:

    1. The ferrotype surface is useful for traditional glazed prints (glossy paper only) if you're into that.

    2. In "Post Exposure" Ctein quotes Krys Krawczyk (of Beseler) as noting that heat drying can affect the final look of a print. (See pp 105-106.)

    Using a hair dryer on glossy surface RC paper definitely helps minimize the milky-mottling and deepen the gloss.

    I don't use glossy fiber paper but using the Arkay heat dryer gives matte surface papers a little more zest.

    However, heat drying is generally not recommended for certain toned prints. It doesn't appear to affect the color of selenium prints toned to completion but may affect sepia or other toning methods.
     
  12. fhovie

    fhovie Subscriber

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    I finanlly gave up using the dryer - I just ahng them now and put them in the press after they are dry. I use a Seal 210 and place each print between two sheets of blotter paper (pre-heated to 210F) and just let the weight of the platten flatten them out over a few minutes. I found using my drum dryer could actually create unwanted creases and if I just hang them dripping wet and let them dry and curl as they like and then put them in the press, I get the best results.