Print negative as negative?

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Kokoro, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. Kokoro

    Kokoro Member

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    not my question but this was posted on the black and white forum on dpreview today:

    "Is it possible to print a negative as a negative. As I want to print in the dark room the image as it appears on the negative. I don't want the positive image. any help would be great thank you."

    I will mention that I have posted it here.

    link: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50199069
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2012
  2. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Yes, lots of ways you can do this and probably the easy way is to use the print as photogram material to make a neg on top of another print, or for better quality use ortho film to make pos/neg.
     
  3. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    make a positive,
    then CONTACT PRINT it on another sheet of paper
    ( test strips and all )
    your print will be a negative ....

    if you have a large format camera
    just shoot a PAPER NEGATIVE
    no contact prints needed.
    if you don't have a LF camera
    you can make a PINHOLE CAMERA and make a paper negative
    or make a camera out of cardboard ( its easy ) and expose a paper negative.
     
  4. nexus757

    nexus757 Member

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    Flop the neg with the emulsion facing the condenser in your enlarger; print a mirror-image positive; then use the positive as a paper negative to contact print a negative under plate glass.
     
  5. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    Piece of cake. direct positive, "Duplicating Film".
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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  7. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    ilford direct positive paper.
     
  8. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    If your friend is interested in doing this the analog way, why don't you invite him/her to join APUG and have a direct discussion with us? Most of us don't bite....
     
  9. gandolfi

    gandolfi Member

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    A fun way would be this:

    Put the negative in the enlarger - expose the image on a new film in your camera without the lens... (The camera is put under the enlarger as if it is a piece of paper..) Having a "modern" one with a decent lightmeter and automatic exposure, you don't even have to mesure the light...

    Expose and develop as normal..

    (This was also used to make huge enlargements of an image in order to get big grain and to get a pictorialistic image..)
     
  10. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    Easiest way is direct positive paper. Otherwise i'd use lith film.
     
  11. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    Direct positive is expensive though... a large sheet of lithfilm, and a contact from the resulting positive would be the way i'd do it. Cheapest is to contact emulsion to emulsion on regular paper.
     
  12. sly

    sly Subscriber

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  13. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    I prefer the double-negative technique. Just by coincidence, I stumbled upon my old copy of Kodak's
    Copying and Duplicating book, about mid-80's vintage. There is a wealth of information in there, even
    though some of the specialized films are no longer specifically available. You might hunt for a copy
    of this publication in some used bookdealer search engine. But not much has changed per technique
    since the 1920's. Helps to have a decent contact printing frame.