Print Presentation

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by ROL, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. ROL

    ROL Member

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  2. mikecnichols

    mikecnichols Member

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    Thanks for sharing. That video has some GREAT tips.
     
  3. PVia

    PVia Member

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    Nice, and thanks.

    What make/model mat cutter is that you're using?
     
  4. Michael A. Smith

    Michael A. Smith Subscriber

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    Although he got his print mounted, there are a number of things he did that I would not recommend. We have been requested to do a mounting video. This may be just the impetus we need to show everyone the easiest, simplest way to mount and overmat prints, whether dry mounting, or using photo corners.

    Michael A. Smith
    Lodima Archival Materials
     
  5. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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    A new high in constructive criticism. Tell him he did something wrong, but not what, or how to improve.

    John Powers
     
  6. jgjbowen

    jgjbowen Member

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    My bride purchased a Logan 750 cutter. It will handle 40" boards. It is a wonderful mat cutter. They are almost always available on Ebay.
     
  7. alroldan12

    alroldan12 Member

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    Hello,

    Being fairly new to dry mounting I learned at least a couple of things from this video. I like how you use a carpenter's square to place the photograph before tacking. Thank you!

    Axel
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 26, 2011
  8. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Subscriber

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    There are only two things I do differently: I don't drag the tacking iron across the back of the print in order to prevent the tissue from wrinkling, and I don't mount the print then hope that I cut the window in the exact right spot. Instead, I let the tacking iron sit still in one place to attach the tissue, and I first cut the overmat, then center the print within it before attaching. I also have a Logan 750 and love it. The Fletcher 2100 is great if you can afford it.
     
  9. Michael A. Smith

    Michael A. Smith Subscriber

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    1. When tacking the tissue to the print, as Greg Davis wrote above, tack only one spot in the center. Do not drag the tacking iron across the print--and certainly not in an "x."

    2. When tacking the trimmed print and tissue to the mount board, tack two adjacent corners ONLY. If you tack all four and the print is not PERFECTLY taut, you will get a wrinkled print.

    3. As Greg also wrote: Cut your overmat first. Then position the print in the overmat. No straight edge needed. No measuring needed.

    4. When lining up the overmat with the mount board, make sure the top is aligned--not opposite corners, not the bottom. usually one hinges the overmat to the mount board, and since you will be hinging them together at the top, it is crucial that the tops are aligned.

    There are probably a few other things, too, but these are the ones that come readily to mind.

    Michael A. Smith
     
  10. fdi

    fdi Advertiser

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    Very nice video but I have to agree about not tacking with an X. I am not a dry mounting expert but I just attended a mounting class at the West Coast Art & Frame convention taught by Chris A. Pacschke. She is the leading expert on mounting for the picture framing industry and has been consulted by various paper and mounting equipment manufacturers and served on preservation boards with people like Wilhelm of Wilhelm Imaging Research.

    She is the author of the book “The Mounting and Laminating Handbook” which I highly recommend. It is considered to be a mounting bible for professional custom picture framers.

    This is a quote from her book, page 87 of the 3rd edition: “Tacking must be done in one spot only, along the end or side of the item to be mounted. Do not tack along an entire edge, at all four corners, in opposite corners or in the center. This could inhibit the paper expansion/contraction when adjusting to temperature and humidity changes while being mounted and create permanent wrinkles or creases in the mounting”

    She has a great website with lots of articles she has written for framing magazines:
    http://www.designsinkpublishing.com/
    Click “Library” button in the lower left side to go to her archive of articles.
     
  11. Rich Ullsmith

    Rich Ullsmith Subscriber

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    Ha ha. Completely unrealistic video. Workspace is far too organized, clean and uncluttered to accomplish anything.

    Other than that, I wish I could have seen this years ago.

    Perhaps it is because of the high humidity here in the PNW, but I find it necessary to drive off the humidity with a ten second press, before re-inserting it to completely drymount. Otherwise, the emulsion can bond to the top mat board.

    Good stuff, Ben. Thank you for putting it together.
     
  12. walbergb

    walbergb Subscriber

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    Pros & cons of using foam board as a backing for dry mounting a print?
     
  13. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Subscriber

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    The foam melts in the heat press. Use archival quality mounting board.
     
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  15. walbergb

    walbergb Subscriber

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    Yes, I have experienced the foam board melting, but that was the result of too long in the press. Fortunately, it was during warm-up and no print was inside. I am careful to monitor the time (2 minutes for FB paper at 195; cooler for RC) when dry mounting a print.
     
  16. George Collier

    George Collier Member

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    We tried using foamcore in school (architecture) in the 70's and found that sometimes it would be ok, but too often, different areas in the sheet would "collapse" from heat/pressure, and you never knew when or where. I don't think it is made with enough consistency for this, and sometimes the sheet had a "low spot" in it before mounting, which would not bond. However, there was a bonding tissue we could use, called Fusion 4000, I think, which worked at a lower temp, and actually fused itself to the two surfaces. It was great stuff, but very expensive. We also bonded with masonite, which we also used for some presentations. We mounted photographs and drawings.
     
  17. ROL

    ROL Member

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    Wow, I naively thought of the effort as a "gift". I had not seen such a simple video anywhere before, and based on the number of recurring novice questions in threads, hoped a visual on "classic" mounting technique might be helpful. The video is intended, as stated, to accompany my text/photo article in which nearly all of your criticisms are addressed (including "overmatting"), albeit briefly. This 10 minute introductory video's intent was never to be the last word on archival methods, nor an hour long master class. Mounting prints does take some experience, rigor and care. Keep in mind that I'm not selling anything used in the video. In fact the print itself is a one-off gift, now winging its way to Stanley, Idaho.

    1. The print/tissue tack can be anything you wish (and, I usually do use a single short line), but I have found a small tack simply will not hold the print securely enough to prevent its separation from the print during the rest of the process before actual mounting. Unfortunately, this first tack is crucial. If the print becomes separated from the tissue at the first tack, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to return to the print and be re-tacked. This can happen all too easily during the trimming of the print/tissue to size, perhaps necessitating destroying the print and starting anew with a fresh print. Suction between the working surface and the tissue, alone may pull an inadequately adhered tissue from the print. Making the center tack substantial, whatever that means to you, and with a tacking iron heated sufficiently to melt the tissue quickly, will adhere the print to the tissue securely, without wrinkling.

    2. The video shows tacking 3 corners only, not 4. I tack 2 or 3 corners, depending on the size of the print.

    3. I think your point confuses overmatting methods with dry mounting. Concerning dry mounting: As stated in the supporting article, I often cut windows and mats for any particular job all at once. I often keep a correctly sized window at hand to confirm positioning before/while tacking print/tissue to mount. Given that there may be slight differences between window and mount dimension, that the mounted print and window may become (purposely) separated, and that many people prefer the bottom window margin somewhat larger (for the purposes of adding a signature to the mount), I consider not establishing the print's position on its mount as accurately as possible before dry mounting to be professionally reckless.

    4. True, if you are overmatting and hinge-mounting – a method of presentation I employ with "plastic" prints, not fiber prints. Just not the subject of a video on dry mounting.

    Using these techniques with the limited consumer-oriented equipment I have (I'm not a professional anything), I don't get "wrinkled" mounted prints, except during the mounting processs of very large prints, a subject and altered technique also described in my supporting article. I believe the supporting video and Techniques articles I write from time to time on my site are clear in their intention:

    "These articles are geared primarily to the enthusiastic beginner/intermediate darkroom worker. It is unlikely that the information herein will be other than of casual interest to the seasoned darkroom artist, except as a chronicle of my particular methods."​

    I look forward to seeing "a few other things..." when you post your video.

    BTW, my video was done with a 5 year old, point and shoot, obtained in a free promotion.
     
  18. ROL

    ROL Member

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    Did you fail to notice the whitewater kayak standing in the corner? :laugh:
     
  19. ROL

    ROL Member

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    I have tried foamcore on occasion, but have not been successful to my satisfaction. I hinge-mount "plastic" prints (thinking of adding this technique to my site's article) to foam board and "overmat" them. Foamcore was not considered archival the last time I looked at it – admittedly a few years ago, despite the fact it may be skinned with buffered paper. So that pretty much precludes using it as an archival technique.
     
  20. Gaga

    Gaga Member

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    I really need to start printing things more. Thanks for all the tips.
     
  21. .∞.

    .∞. Member

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    This was really helpful. Thanks.

    When you send your prints off, do you send anything with them?
     
  22. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    Ben

    Thanks for sharing. Everyone has slightly different techniques. For example, I use my tacking iron completely differently. You seem to use the tip to 'draw' lines, where I just put it down flat and slightly move it back and forth on one spot. This seems to be more gentle with the print.

    One contribution I like to make refers to the print position on the mount board (see attached). It's called: finding the optical center. I don't use it as a rigid rule, but as a starting point from where to improve the print position further. I also look for even borders (top and sides) as long as the bottom border is always slightly wider than the top.
     

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  23. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    Helpful video. The best tip for me was the shot bag. I've learned how to dry mount on my own and seeing how a shot bag is used helps.

    Ralph: in your diagram, how do you determine point "0" (or where line A is located)
     
  24. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    The ‘optical center’ of the mount makes for an attractive print placement in most situations. To find this optical center, align the upper left-hand corners of the print and mount-board in point ‘A’. Now, bisect the remaining spaces to the bottom and right of the print, creating lines ‘a’ and ‘b’, respectively. Then, connect point ‘B’ and ‘0’, creating line ‘c’, which intersects line ‘b’ in point ‘1’. Finally, align the lower right-hand corner of the print (point ‘C’) with point ‘1’ on the mount-board. The print is now at the optical center of the mount.

    If you feel this results in the print being too high or too low on the mount, slide it up or down until you have equal top and side borders, or find a more attractive distribution of space, but always maintain a vertical print offset.
     
  25. ShaneLee

    ShaneLee Member

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    Is there any alternatives to using a dry mount press? They seem rather expensive and their not something I could afford at the moment.

    Also could anyone recommend anywhere to buy frames and mat boards in the UK?
     
  26. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    Shane

    A clothes iron, but I would call around or check on internet forums. I've seen them given away for free to people who are willing to pick them up.