Printing on glossy paper...

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by ilfordrapid, Sep 23, 2005.

  1. ilfordrapid

    ilfordrapid Member

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    I will soon be changing to Ilford Multigrade FB Warmtone, there are two surfaces available, simi matt, and glossy. Does anyone see anything wrong with making fine art prints on a glossy surface? It seems to have a greater brilliance than a textured surface. Do you think it would be shunned by the general public (non-photographer) at art shows?
     
  2. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    the general public may not be able to tell the difference.

    Print on the paper that gives the results you wish for the specific image.
     
  3. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    FB air dried glossy paper is widely accepted and used for fine art prints.
     
  4. gbroadbridge

    gbroadbridge Member

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    Just a 'heads-up'.

    The FB glossy is not anywhere near as glossy as the RC glossy.

    It's closer to an RC pearl finish.


    Graham.
     
  5. ilfordrapid

    ilfordrapid Member

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    Thanks Graham! The surface is smooth though right?
     
  6. gbroadbridge

    gbroadbridge Member

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    Yep
     
  7. raucousimages

    raucousimages Member

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    My favorite papers are cold tone FB glossy. I cant hide neg defects as easly on glossy so I must to my best printing.
     
  8. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear ilfrodrapid,

    Do you think the print looks best on RC glossy? If so, then use RC glossy.

    Neal Wydra
     
  9. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Fiber based glossy paper will dry to a hi gloss if you use a ferrotype (chromium) plate or electric dryer. When dried on a screen, in a blotter book, for face down in a electric dryer prints are semimatt.
     
  10. ilfordrapid

    ilfordrapid Member

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    Neal, If I used glossy RC do you think that people who buy fine art would buy them.
     
  11. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    In terms of glossy vs semigloss, there are 2 trains of thought, one is too avoid gloss for prints that are to be hung on a wall as you don't want any glare, the other thought is that some prints need a high gloss to show the fine detail. I know that some folks print on both RC and fiber and charge a lower price for RC.
     
  12. dphphoto

    dphphoto Member

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    Different brands of paper will look different when air dried, even if they're all listed as glossy. Try Adox and Kentmere; both look a lot different than Ilford, and not just in terms of surface appearance. Adox has an incredibly long scale, so much so that I contact 8X10 negs on it.
    Paul Caponigro is a good example of someone who prints on a lot of different papers. In "The Voice of the Print," an exhibition catalog, you can read about how he feels different papers will each give a different look to the same negative.
    Dean
     
  13. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear ilfordrapid,

    People have purchased fine art color photos printed on RC paper in the past. I would think that you could sell b&w prints on RC paper as well.

    I should have been clearer. My intended suggestion was to choose the paper and finish that you believe works best for the image. Will there be people who refuse to purchase prints on RC paper? I believe so. Will you sell more prints if you use FB glossy, matte, ferrotyped, or whatever? I think the one that catches the eye will sell more than one that doesn't draw attention. Should you use my opinion as the basis of your decision? I wouldn't. <g>

    Neal Wydra
     
  14. ilfordrapid

    ilfordrapid Member

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    Thanks for your reply Neal. This is a important subject to me as I am going to be building a web site offering my work for sale. What actually is the demand for prints to be made on FB, I suspect that it would be a small percentage. I think that you are right Neal, I think it really only matters what catches the buyers eye. And besides that, isn't it true that if you properly fix, and wash, and selenium tone a RC print it will at least out live the buyer or longer. I have only considered going to FB because I have been told that it gives better print qualities. PLEASE ANYONE JUMP IN HERE I WANT TO KNOW WHAT YOU THINK. Thanks
     
  15. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    For a print that will be framed, behind glass, I question whether a viewer could even tell whether it's FB or RC. Perhaps some of the master printers around here could, but I wouldn't bet I could. And if the RC print could sell for, say, 1/2 the price because it requires so much less resources to produce (faster exposure, faster development, faster wash, dries flat and smooth), it'd be a lot more likely to wind up on my wall. Certainly, I'd like assurance that the print will still be in good condition in 20-50 years, but it seems RC paper isn't as bad, archivally, as was suspected when it was new (or the newer papers are better than the old).

    As for glossy vs. matte, to me, glossy is what tells me it's silver gelatin, even if it's behind glass. If I see a matte print, I'm not certain, but if it's glossy, and I don't see bronzing or variations in gloss across tones, then I can be pretty certain it's not a "gicleee" or some other fancy name for an inkjet print. And if there's glare on the print where it hangs, then there's either a serious lighting problem or the print is hung in a bad location (where a source of glare can't be controlled).

    So, I'll take a glossy RC print. Extra bonus -- RC prints will stay flat without dry mounting, which again is likely to save me money in getting a fine print onto the wall.

    But my opinions don't matter much if you're trying to make a living selling prints -- I haven't got enough money to throw around to affect your income one way or the other.
     
  16. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear ilfordrapid'

    The document at the link below contains some information (starting on page 30 or so).

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/o3/o3.pdf

    Glossy or not? If you're going to be at art/craft shows you have the opportunity to test the waters. You can offer the same print with different surfaces.

    I truly wish you good fortune in this endeavor.

    Neal Wydra
     
  17. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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  18. ilfordrapid

    ilfordrapid Member

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    Thanks a bunch Neal! I will check out these sites at my earliest convenience.