Probably a really dumb question.. re: exposure

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by apconan, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. apconan

    apconan Member

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    Maybe not specific to large format, but always read that large format requires long exposures.

    Lately a lot of my photos are taken slower than 1/8 or so. A lot of them are turning out with trees having this blur effect because of the wind. How does one avoid this?
     
  2. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    LF doesn't require long exposures.

    Just use a faster film or larger aperture or both to get a faster shutter speed.
     
  3. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Use faster film and shorter shutter speeds.
     
  4. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    Include the word "wind" in your photo title and don't worry about it.
    juan
     
  5. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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    As other APUGers have said, LF cameras don't require longer exposures. I think LF shooters shoot longer exposures is that most of not all LF cameras are used on tripods so phptographers that shoot them won't limit themselves to slower shutter speeds.
     
  6. apconan

    apconan Member

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    Ok, miswording, but more likely to use longer exposure because lenses aren't as fast.
    So it's pretty much hopeless when the sun is really low?
     
  7. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    Most of my exposures are long, but that has a lot to do with the lack of light under the old redwoods than format. And then there is this thing about having everything in focus, so I am using f32 to f64, sometimes f90 -- there are few distance views in the redwoods, so one is dealing with distances of 6 to 8 feet away in the foreground, and the background being 30 feet to several hundred yards away. I am using an 8x10 with a standard lens of 300mm -- so due to the long focal length, the inherently small DoF is something to contend with. It is a relatively fast lens -- f5.6, but I rarely use anything less than f22. Portraiture is where one often see lenses used wide open

    So my exposures (125 ASA to 400 ASA films) range more in the minute range, as in one to 30 minutes. The trick is knowing when the wind is not blowing in a particular area. After 30 years of photographing along the same creek, I can step outside and have a good sense of what the weather/wind will be doing up there (it is 50 miles north of my home). If the wind (or just the lightest of a breeze) is blowing when I get there, it just turns into a nice day for a walk -- and I might as well take the 8x10 along just in case the wind stops, or I come across an image that I can put the word "Wind" into the title.
     
  8. apconan

    apconan Member

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    Ok, I realize it's not specific to large format. I only put it in this forum because I wasn't sure where to put the thread. Thanks for the replies though.
     
  9. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    ISO 400 film helps. Otherwise, some days just are not meant for using a big camera if you insist on still pictures.

    Peter Gomena