Processing 110 / 16mm film format

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by delphine, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. delphine

    delphine Member

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    Hi all,

    I will probably have to process 10+ rolls format 110 in a month time. This would be a one-off.
    110 film reel are pretty hard to come by, and expensive when they do. Also, I'd spend a lot of time process each film one by one if I was getting a reel.
    I am wondering whether there is not another solution to process the rolls. Could they be tray processed?

    Any ideas welcome.

    Best

    D
     
  2. Ian C

    Ian C Member

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  3. dsmccrac

    dsmccrac Member

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  4. Alan W

    Alan W Subscriber

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    I'm gonna give the instructions above a bash.
     
  5. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    I've processed them in 2 different ways.

    1, with a 16mm jobo reel (pretty cheap) dremeled out slightly in the center with a sanding bit to fit a paterson column for a paterson tank, works great.

    And, in the 120 cartridge holder in the 120 lane on a fuji frontier C-41 processor, the machine also detects it as 110 size.
     
  6. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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  7. rthomas

    rthomas Member

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    I have successfully processed 16mm short lengths in a normal metal tank. My method is to tape the 16mm film, emulsion side out, onto a previously-processed "junk" roll of 120 film. I tape both ends of the 16mm film down on the larger roll of 120, leaving only a little slack; obviously this is done in total darkness but it's not difficult. Then I load the 120 film onto a stainless-steel reel and put it in the tank. I process it as if it was a roll of 120. Uses a bit more chemistry that the 16mm film needs, but it works. I think you could do a couple 16mm rolls per 120 roll.

    Now if my 16mm camera didn't have a dozen light-leaks, I'd be all set.

    EDIT - I tried this trick by taping 16mm film to 35mm film and it did not work, the film was too close together.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 29, 2012
  8. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    The Yankee Clipper II reel adjusts to 110 size; although the quality of this product is so-so (the plastic is quite brittle compared to others), it will work if handled gently. If you can find replacement reels inexpensively, you can use multiple reels in a tray w/o the tanks in total darkness to process several at one time.

    There's a Nikor 16mm reel on ebay currently. If I were doing 110, I'd buy that one.
     
  9. jcoldslabs

    jcoldslabs Member

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  10. AgX

    AgX Member

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    The Jobo 135/120 reel can be modified to take 16mm film.

    I think I posted on this in the past.
     
  11. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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  12. delphine

    delphine Member

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    Lots of great advice ! thank you all, that is helpful.

    The reference to the vintage article posted by Ian is a great find !