Processing E6

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by anyte, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. anyte

    anyte Member

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    I'm looking for resources - recommended books or online sites on how to process E6 film.

    I've searched but all I find are sites for vendors - which don't give a complete picture on what a person needs and what the process entails.
     
  2. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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  3. rjr

    rjr Member

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  4. Woolliscroft

    Woolliscroft Member

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    Don't worry, it really is very easy. If you can process B&W you will have no trouble with E6 except that it likes the temperatures a bit more accurate. If you put the developing tank in a water bath (a washing up bowl will do) that becomes no problem and you don't need any special equipment. I did my first film just by reading the instructions with the chemistry kit and it worked fine.

    David.
     
  5. photomc

    photomc Member

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    Would have to agree that it really is pretty easy..did some several years ago, about 15 or so and the slides still look good. I think others here have talked about using a foam cooler (like the cheap ones for beer) fill it with water a given temp (could use one of the aquarium heaters) and your off. Think I used an old Kodak Hobby Pack, but they stopped making them..not sure what is out there now, but try a kit of some kind if you can find it..others here will be in the KNOW better than I am. Get a roll of film that you don't care about and practice rolling it on the reel and you will be ready to go. Good Luck!
     
  6. Bruce Osgood

    Bruce Osgood Membership Council Council

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  7. Stan. L-B

    Stan. L-B Member

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    I have used three popular E6 kits in the past, from Patterson Kodak and Jobo.

    Although the mixing of the solutions do vary with the different brands, in proportions and time, provided the instruction are followed there will be no problem.

    With the JOBO Expert System Processor, there is constant agitation, but I have not
    had any noticable variation in quality when using hand tank processing - with inverting and rolling slowly during all of the first development.
    As stated, the time and temp. is very important and has to be spot on for the first development, whether processing by hand or machine.

    It is not at all complicated and well worth developing your very own method of working whether by kit or otherwise.
     
  8. anyte

    anyte Member

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    Flotsam - thank you for the link. I read through this morning and was greatful for how detailed the process is.

    rjr - I can't open that document - I'm denied access. I get the impression that it's not in a language I could read. I appreciate the thought though.

    Wolliscroft - I've never done any processing at all. I should probably get a book on B&W processing just so I can understand what everyone else is always talking about.

    Bruce - thank you. After reading the link I checked out the FAQ and took some time to look at the processors which filled in a lot of gaps for me.

    Stan - thank you for the input. Finally, a practical use for my nit-picking obsessive personality traits. :smile:
     
  9. anyte

    anyte Member

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    Ooops. Didn't mean to overlook your post. Some good ideas and good advice. Thank you.
     
  10. Woolliscroft

    Woolliscroft Member

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    If you haven't done any B&W processing, I'd recommend deving a few films before trying colour, even if you don't normally use B&W film, just to get the hang of the process. It is rather more forgiving than slide film and, who knows, you might get to like it.

    David.
     
  11. anyte

    anyte Member

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    I don't see well in B&W though I do make a practice of shooting a roll or two every few months. If it could be done in the kitchen sink I could give it a try but I'd need detailed list of supplies and instructions for that as well.
     
  12. Flotsam

    Flotsam Member

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    If you process B&W negs, then you'll probably want to do your own enlarging which is a big jump in the equipment and space required. I started out by processing slides at home. In school I noticed that a lot of people who were starting out by doing B&W were much less critical in their processing, thinking that they could fix anything in printing.

    Pay attention to all of the safety warnings on the packaging. Rubber gloves are essential. An apron and eye protection are a very wise idea as well.
     
  13. anyte

    anyte Member

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    I hadn't even considered that. I'll have to add those items to my shopping list. Thank you.
     
  14. bkorites

    bkorites Member

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    Where I live there is only one lab that will process slides and they charge $11/roll and it takes one day. If I do it myself, after buying the chemicals and slide mounts, how much would you estimate I would save by doing it myself. film?
     
  15. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    Here in Australia, the Agfa kits for E6 cost about $20 AUD and that is enough for 4 rolls of 35mm, so it's $5 AUD (about $3.50 USD) per roll. I've never used slide mounts, so I'm not sure what they cost.