Processing K-12

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by 2F/2F, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Hello,

    Pulled a roll of Kodachrome II K-12 from my new Argus C-3 today. I understand that I can process this as a black and white film only nowadays. Anything I should know before I just throw it into some HC-110? I don't need slides. Negs are fine.

    The camera itself is very sweet. In excellent condition with never-ready case, flash, cased Weston meter, and original box. And all for...FREE. :D
     
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  2. Fredrik Sandstrom

    Fredrik Sandstrom Member

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  3. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Thanks for the info.

    Why would a still film have a remjet coating, though? The guy in the link is writing about motion picture film, if I read it correctly. Same theory, but the roll I have should not have a remjet backing.
     
  4. E76

    E76 Member

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    I believe all Kodachrome film, motion picture or not, has a remjet backing. Was the base side of the film black? If so, there's a good chance it has remjet applied.
     
  5. Mark Antony

    Mark Antony Member

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    As far as I know all Kodachrome has a remjet backing layer that must be removed in an alkaline wash before processing.
    The K14 first developer bath is basically a PQ mono developer I think Ilford make almost the same product.
    Mark
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Cool. Thanks, all. I will either use my D-19 or my Ilford PQ, both of which are already in hand, and let you know what happens.

    I am interested in hearing more about remjet removal, however. One guy sez do it before, and another guy sez do it after. What has worked for y'all?
     
  7. Fredrik Sandstrom

    Fredrik Sandstrom Member

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    As others have said, all Kodachrome films, still and movie, has remjet. The reasons are probably mostly historical.
    In normal Kodachrome processing, remjet removal is the first step. I wouldn't try to do it that way though, since it needs to be done in complete darkness and you'd have no way to see if you're getting everything off. After processing, when the film is wet, the backing ought to come off pretty easily, and you can see what you're doing.
     
  8. David Grenet

    David Grenet Member

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    While I don't have any experience in this, my understanding is that if you don't remove the remjet backing first it will come off in the developer and potentially stick to the emulsion.

    I'd remove it first...
     
  9. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    First use a bath of one teaspoon sodium sulfite per liter to soften the remjet, then rinse/agitate or remove it with a cloth in the dark. You are better off reversing it because the film contains a yellow filter made of silver which will only go away if bleached. You will have a hard time printing the negatives on most materials.